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Poll: Does 'Battlestar Galactica' deserve an Emmy bid for best drama series?

March 21, 2009 | 10:45 am

The series conclusion of "Battlestar Galactica" earned praise from TV critics, who saw it before it aired Friday night. The L.A. Times' Mary McNamara raved, " 'Battlestar Galactica's' finale is everything a fan, of the show and of television, could hope for."

But what about devout fans and regular TV viewers? Now that the finale has been telecast, posters in the Envelope's message boards cheer it too. Addressing the creator of "The Sopranos," poster PaulHan says, "That's how you end a television series, David Chase, and every other showrunner out there. There aren't enough stars in the sky to properly rate this episode."

Battlestar_galactica_finale_4

"Battlestar Galactica" creator Ron Moore discussed aspects of the finale with TVGuide.com, revealing how he and his writing team approached crafting it: "We kind of came up with this structure of flashbacks to show you where they end up after seeing where they came from and that formed the backbone of what the finale was going to be."

Moore also cited the part he personally likes most: "I think the moment when Kara jumps the ship and when we pan up seeing the Earth rise up from the moon was probably my favorite moment because it really is the end point — in terms of story — from where we began."

Now how will Emmy voters respond? "Battlestar Galactica" has only won two Emmys — both for visual effects. It's never been nominated for best series or for an acting award and, frankly, has little hope considering the recent changes in the voting process.

But let's forget about that for a sec. In an ideal TV universe, do you think "Battlestar Galactica" deserves a shot at TV's top award? Do you even think it should win?

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Photo: Sci Fi Channel

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Comments

I'm sorry, I'm a huge BSG fan but I've lost my faith in Emmys.

I've had some time to ponder the BSG series finale and I realized something important in the way that Ron Moore has challenged so much science fiction that has come before. In stories of man vs. sentient machines or man vs. hostile aliens, there is a kind of "our opponents are soulless and evil" or "we are god's chosen" kind of mentality behind the reason why mankind triumph's. Moore made us question that attitude with BSG. In the end, it wasn't humanity that triumphed in BSG. Those who triumphed were all those who stopped seeing others as different from us as being evil or inferior. So kudos to Moore from getting away from the human chauvinism that infests science fiction. And he took the implicit religious attitudes that pervades the man vs. hostile machines/aliens stories and turned that on its head by making the religious attitudes explicit.

on a much smaller note, it is an interesting parallel between the Cylon sleeper agents who truly believed they were human until they completed their assignments and Kara as an angel who thought she was a human until she completed her assignment.

I'm looking at the bigger picture here, and I don't mean a movie. I'm not concerned about the awards, I am more concerned that other sci-fi creators were taking notes during the last 5 years and realized how to make a good show. I am a huge sci-fi fan and I believe BSG saved science fiction from the death grips of monster aliens and lame dialogues. How many of you were embarrased six years ago to tell anyone that you liked science fiction? BSG took great acting, great writing, added it with realistic human conflict and rolled into an awsome sci-fi setting. I don't want BSG copy cats, I want BETTER SCI-FI. Thank you BSG.

P.S . What did Adama do with his Rapture?

While Battlestar Galactica is one of the most magnificent works of Science Fiction to this date, both the original and the re-imagined, it is far from deserving any critical praise. I'm still waiting for the day when writers get their heads out of the sky and actually think about the fans. Not just the casual television viewer that's seen a couple reruns and doesn't give a rats ass about the shows plot, but the fans who actually care about the work of art in front of them! However, with that finale, it was both wonderful, and a flaming piece of monkey shit. I understand having to leave space for speculation and expansion, but come on, that whole last scene - those precious last few minutes - took a keg of stagnant liquor, sealed the coffin, lit a match, and shoved a fork in it's left eye.

Science fiction in the sense of BSG is simply a setting for a story. Science Fiction portends a world that will be or that by a twist of fate has already been. The world as much as in any other story is defined by more than the setting it is created by the people and beings which inhabit it, not by formulas and strictures. A "period piece" such as the much balyhood (yes I said balyhood!) Mad Men is far more predictable and formulaic than BSG and much of that is owed to the fact that BSG has a far superior setting. The stereotypes about conventions have been turned on thier heads and the networks and critics were both the first to take note and the last to understand its meaning. I don't know whether its ignorance or spite that will kill BSG's chances at an emmy.

it is boring, very boring. All they do is talking and crying. and some kissing.zzzzzzzzz

Ronald Moore has created an absolute masterpiece with this series and he doesn't need a award to realize it. That being said, I hope they sweep the Emmys! The actors and staff have worked too long and too hard creating one of the finest stories ever brought to television, and they deserve the highest praise for doing so.

I thought this show was going to be canceled. I believe it does have a small number of viewers who remain faithful. Where it may have not succeeded is in the fact it would be considered one of the best drama shows. When I attempted to watch this that is what I felt I was watching. It turned me off. I really wanted to see sci-fi. If I wanted drama I will watch Law and Order.

Who care for an awards body that honors Everybody Loves Raymond over Arrested Development?

This won't get any awards. Actually as it should be. These awards are for the ordinary.
This show/script was way above and beyond anything that can be appreciated by the mainstream.
The mainstream elected Bush 2x for pete's sake. What do they know?

no one has ever dared to write a more human drama than this for tv.
Like all great sci-fi (asimov, bradbury, lem, vonnegut) they tell what is a human story set in a futuristic or non-ordinary setting.

No, and thank goodness this foolishly overvalued piece of hackery stands so little chance of getting an Emmy nod. To deserve an Emmy one should hope would require a roomful of screw-ups making it up as they go along -- by Moore's own admission -- rather than dedicating a little forethought and planning to writing a series that makes any kind of internal sense. Thankfully this long-dead zombie of a show has finally lurched to an end, overwrought and frankly unbelievable as it was.

Let's be honest: the Emmys (like virtually any entertainment awards) are not always about fairness.

To make matters worse, Galactica has some strikes against it right out of the gate: the awkward name; its low rent cable network (Sci-Fi); its complex, ongoing storyline; and its very status as a sci-fi show.

Nonetheless, Galactica has not lacked for critical encomiums, and not just from its fans. In Olmos, McDonnell, and Hogan, it has some top flight actors - so good that many were left scratching their heads that the show could land them (especially McDonnell). But once the quality of the writing and directing becomes apparent, you realize what a glaring omission it has been that Galactica has never gotten a single Emmy for any dramatic category.

I admit I didn't want to give Galactica the benefit of the doubt. But once I gave it a chance belatedly in its second season, it was apparent to me that Galactica doesn't just raise the bar for sci-fi shows, it's as good as anything on TV today. We can only hope that in this its final season, the Emmys finally give the show the love it has long deserved.

Science fiction television series almost never receive proper recognition at the Emmys. I will be insulted if Battlestar does not win an Emmy. It is the most amazing show I have ever seen in my life.

Yes, it deserves an Emmy, but not for it's finale.

The series as a whole and most of the final episode were extremely well written. I felt let down by the final ending though. Coming to our earth was great. The characters endings were awesome. However, the decision of humanity to relinquish all of their civilization was abysmal. How could all of their collective humanity choose societal suicide? What were they fighting for all those years? They might as well have stayed on Caprica and died there. I found it too fatalistic, too tidy, too easy an ending. Mind you, I'm just talking the last 10 minutes of a truly landmark series, but the ending left a bad taste in my mouth. 150,000 years ago means they didn't contribute anything to homo sapiens but DNA. It would have been better to have them arrive 10 or 15 thousand years ago rather than 150 thousand. Then have them truly jumpstart our civilization and not just give up. That would have been early enough for them become early mythology, and late enough for some early writings of their struggle... this has all happened before... That would have been perfect.

The series as a whole and most of the final episode were extremely well written. I felt let down by the final ending though. Coming to our earth was great. The characters endings were awesome. However, the decision of humanity to relinquish all of their civilization was abysmal. How could all of their collective humanity choose societal suicide? What were they fighting for all those years? They might as well have stayed on Caprica and died there. I found it too fatalistic, too tidy, too easy an ending. Mind you, I'm just talking the last 10 minutes of a truly landmark series, but the ending left a bad taste in my mouth. 150,000 years ago means they didn't contribute anything to homo sapiens but DNA. It would have been better to have them arrive 10 or 15 thousand years ago rather than 150 thousand. Then have them truly jumpstart our civilization and not just give up. That would have been early enough for them become early mythology, and late enough for some early writings of their struggle... this has all happened before... That would have been perfect.

Personally I think the show is terrible. Very badly written. Extremely overrated. At least it's over. (not that there is a lot of better stuff on TV...but Lost is 1000x times better).

An Emmy for BSG is long overdue. Friday nights just won't be the same without it. The final episode was perfect, though it would have been a bit more poignant had it ended at the point where Adama is sitting on the hillside next to Roslin's grave.

This stunning show deserves all the accolades on Earth. It grabbed and engaged me each epsiode. The entire package - writing ,acting, editing, special effects, etc., are heads above anything else on TV. The sci fi element was really incidental to the character development and plot.

The new series mocks the old series. It is a totally different show, yet continues to claim an association with the original. We remain offended by any marketing or acclaim associated with the new series.

This was two of the best hours on television ever. If that isn't honored then awards mean nothing.

all these people can drink the kool aid, the fact is the end of this series is a textbook example of deus ex machina. mixing bad science with bad religion makes bad science fiction. it's not that ghosts and prophecy and sci-fi don't mix, it's that bsg didn't mix them well. plus a laughable "twsit" ending that's out of the hitchhiker's guide, except that was PURPOSEFULLY a comedy. feh!

My guess is the Emmy gurus were afraid that if they had awarded the show in the past, then at some point it would have jumped the shark, brought in 8-foot blue snail people, and become an embarrassment. Well, that didn't happen, so now they'd better pony up with some love.

Of course BSG deserves an Emmy! For crying out loud, Hollywood's been so snooty when it comes to science fiction stuff. Blade Runner got an Oscar nom (for special effects, if I recall correctly), Star Wars never got any real nods other than for visual effects and its music. Science fiction is really a great medium that seriously does explore many important themes of humanity, machinery and the like. I honestly don't get why Edward James Olmos, Mary McDonnel, James Callis and Tricia Helfer never got any kinds of nods.


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