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Bold wins at Daytime Emmy Awards: 'Bold and the Beautiful,' 'The View'

August 30, 2009 |  7:56 pm

After 22 years on the air, "The Bold and the Beautiful" finally won its first victory as best drama series when the Daytime Emmy Awards were bestowed at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles. It had been nominated for the top Emmy several times, but many award gurus believed it might never win, being a half-hour program competing against one-hour rivals.

Bold and the beautiful daytime emmys tv news 7

See a list of Daytime Emmy winners here. Also check out the list of winners at the Creative Arts ceremony. Read the transcript of our live chat session here.

Another big shock at the Daytime Emmys was the victory by "The View" for best talk-show host, a category that has never been won by a multiple-host program over more than 35 years. Historically, there's a strong bias in favor of single-host programs winning in the separate category as best talk-show too, but "The View" did manage to break that jinx once — in 2003 when it tied with "The Wayne Brady Show." This year Emmy watchers were outraged that "The View" wasn't nominated for best talk show, only reaping a bid in the host race. Its stars, Joy Behar, Elisabeth Hasselbeck, Whoopi Goldberg, Sherri Shepherd and Barbara Walters didn't bother to travel from New York to Los Angeles for the ceremony. "We're accepting it on their behalf," presenter Jennie Garth said when no one appeared at the podium to claim the statuette for best hosting. However, co-presenter and "90210" costar Lori Loughlin warned, "We're not giving it back!"

There were lots of first-time winners at the Daytime Emmys, including Tamara Braun ("Days of Our Lives") as best supporting actress and "Days" co-star Darin Brooks as best younger actor. Accepting his trophy, Brooks got bleeped by TV censors, then gushed, "Ooo, did I swear? I knew that was going to happen!" That "Days" reaped two acting honors surprised many Emmy watchers. The program is often shrugged off by the conservative TV industry at awards time because it skews to a young, hipster demographic.

First-time champ Vincent Irizarry ("All My Children") shared the laurels for best supporting actor with another rookie victor, Jeff Branson ("Guiding Light"), who acknowledged cancellation of his program, gasping, "72 years! I give this to all of us."

Another first-time champ was Julie Berman ("General Hospital"), who exclaimed as she claimed the younger-actress trophy, "Oh, my God! Oh, my God! This is so scary. I haven't shaken this much since I auditioned for this part!"

Among repeat winners was Christian LeBlanc ("Young and the Restless") as best actor. Susan Haskell ("One Life to Live") won best actress for the first time, but previously triumphed in the supporting-actress race back in 1994.

"Rachael Ray" proved that its upset victory over "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" last year as best talk show (entertainment) was no fluke. After Ellen's program won the talk-show category four years in a row, Rachael's yakfest took its second consecutive victory.

Just like last year, the Discovery Channel's "Cash Cab" again crossed the finish line first in the race as best game show, repeating its breakthrough victory for basic cable. Accepting its second trophy, its producer said, "I think it's pretty staggering that for two years in a row we've been seen in the same light as international game-show icons like 'Jeopardy' and 'Millionaire,' and to win out against that kind of competition is a little shocking, but no less wonderful."

There was speculation among pundits this year that "Dr. Phil" might finally win best talk show (informative), but "The Tyra Banks Show" prevailed for a second year in a row. Accepting the prize, Banks roared, "This is for the women out there who just do not feel beautiful and do not have time to do your makeup because you're rushing after your kids. I get it. This is for the kids in high school that feel insecure when they walk onto that campus because they're surrounded by hate. This is for you guys! You rock!"

The evening included a heartfelt farewell to the canceled "Guiding Light." Betty White introduced the video tribute, saying, " 'Guiding Light' started off on radio in 1937 and, in 1952, it became the first soap opera on TV and to this day it has become the longest-running drama in TV and radio history. But as the saying goes, all good things must come to an end."

The ceremony included a grandly staged tribute to "Sesame Street" upon its 40th anniversary, which came at a curious time in its awards history. For decades, "Sesame Street" so dominated the race for best children's show that, in 1995, TV academy spun off a separate category for pre-school children's shows just to get it out of the way and let other juvenile programs share the gold. Ever since that new category was hatched, "Sesame Street" romped through it too — except this year when it was beaten by "Between the Lions" on Saturday night at the Creative Arts ceremony.

Underdog victories over popular competition happen often at the Emmys because the awards aren't chosen by popular ballot like other showbiz peer-group awards -- the Oscars, Grammys and Tonys. Emmys are decided by a few dozen jurors who view video samples submitted by nominees as examples of their best work.

Gold Derby's award prophets did an excellent job forecasting who'd win. Check out our posters' predix in these categories: best drama series, lead actor, lead actress, supporting actor, supporting actress, younger actor, younger actress, talk show (entertainment). talk show (informative), talk show host, game show, drama writing, drama directing

See more Daytime Emmy predictions in our forums, which is always buzzing with chat about all showbiz awards.

RELATED POSTS

Best and worst of the Daytime Emmys

Photo gallery: Daytime Emmy red-carpet arrivals

List of Daytime Emmy winners

Photo: CBS

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Comments

I was so delighted on Sunday to hear the announcement of The Bold & the Beautiful's win. It was very well deserved. Then CW Network threw ice water on my excitement by showing the credits rather than the acceptance speeches. That is inexcusable and so unprofessional. Is there a website where we can listen to the acceptance speeches and watch all the excitement?

Boiddiva02 and JC, you need to learn to read a little better: "Susan Haskell ("One Life to Live") won best actress for the first time, but previously triumphed in the supporting-actress race back in 1994." "Triumphed" as used here means won.

Hillary B. Smith also won Emmy gold in 1994 for her phenomenal work during the Marty gang rape storyline. She was the last actress to win the Emmy for lead actress in a drama series for OLTL other than Erika Slezak (who's won 3 additional times since) until now.

What happened last night at the end of the Daytime Emmy presentation--The CW cutting off the program just as The Bold & The Beautiful's cast and producers were about to give their acceptance speeches--was disgraceful and inexcusable. That's comparable with ABC cutting off the Oscars before awarding Best Picture, or CBS fading the Grammy Awards to black just as Record or Song Of The Year gets presented. Someone at both The CW and the Academy of TV Arts & Sciences should go public with why this happened. Why didn't The CW alert its affiliates the show was running long and would be on another 5-10 minutes, so keep it on? Did either entity communicate with each other at all? This is the kind of situation that will insure fewer Daytime Emmy presentation viewers in the future, as well as The CW carrying it, or any other Emmy ceremony, in the future.

Simon Applebaum
Producer/Host
Tomorrow Will Be Televised
(Mondays at noon, PT/www.blogtalkradio.com)

Thanks, Boidiva02 and JC. I added that clarification to the article.

Actually Susan Haskell has won an emmy before, in 1994 for Supporting Actress. it was only her first win as a lead actress.

If you are referring to Susan Haskell being a first time winner in the Lead Race then you are correct if you are referring to overall, she actually won supporting actress in 1994. Haskell is also the first non-Erika Slezak winner since, well, 1994 when she and Roger Howarth won awards.


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