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Category: AngelinaJolie

'The Dark Knight' dominates Saturn Awards with 11 nods while 'Twilight' is almost shut out

March 11, 2009 |  4:39 am

"The Dark Knight" dominates the competition at the upcoming Saturn Awards, leading with 11 nominations, including a best picture bid as well as acting nods for leads Christian Bale and Maggie Gyllenhaal and supporting players Heath Ledger and Aaron Eckhart. Three years ago, "Batman Begins" won three of its nine Saturn Awards races — fantasy film, lead actor (Christian Bale), and writing (Christopher Nolan and David S. Goyer).

The_dark_knight_saturn_awards

This 35th annual edition of the awards honors films across four genres — sci-fi, fantasy, horror and action/adventure/thriller. That last catch-all category is where "The Dark Knight" is competing against "Changeling," "Gran Torino," "Quantum of Solace," "Traitor," and "Valkyrie."

"Valkyrie," directed by sci-fi veteran Bryan Singer, earned mixed reviews but did surprisingly well in terms of the Saturns. Besides that best picture bid, the film's seven Saturn nods include one for leading man Tom Cruise and another for Singer. Cruise is a previous seven-time Saturn nominee with one win for "Vanilla Sky" back in 2001, while Singer is a five-time contender winning for "X-Men" in 2000.

As the acting races span all four genres, Cruise's competition besides Bale (a two-time nominee) includes Oscar nominee Brad Pitt, who picked up his third Saturn nod with his bid for "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button." That epic time-traveling fantasy earned nine nods in total. Sci-fi hit "Iron Man" scored eight including a lead actor nom for Robert Downey Jr., who won this award in 1993 for "Heart and Souls" and had one other nod. Harrison Ford contends for his work in the sci-fi romp "Indiana Jones & the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull," which has six nominations in total. Ford won lead actor for "Raiders of the Lost Ark" in 1982 and has now been nominated for all four films in the franchise.

Heartthrob Robert Pattinson was snubbed for his leading role in "Twilight." Did past four-time nominee Will Smith, who won the award last year for "I Am Legend," edge him out with his nod for "Hancock"? That critical flop but commercial hit also landed a bid for best fantasy film as well as a second supporting actress nod for Charlize Theron. The only nomination for "Twilight" came in the fantasy film race where it faces off against "Hancock" as well as "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian," "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," "The Spiderwick Chronicles" and "Wanted."

Pattinson's "Twilight" love interest, Kristen Stewart, was likewise left off the list of lead actress nominees. Oscar contender Angelina Jolie competes here as "Changeling" earned her a third Saturn nod. Among her competiton are two other Oscar winners — Cate Blanchett, who picked up Saturn nod No. 4 for "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," and Gwyneth Paltrow, who landed her second Saturn nom for "Iron Man" — as well as four-time Oscar nominee Julianne Moore, who is now a four-time Saturn nominee with her bid for "Blindness," newbie Emily Mortimer ("Transsiberian"), and one-time past Saturn nominee Gyllenhaal.

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Gold Derby nuggets: Campaigners crash after the Oscars | Did Jennifer Aniston snicker when Brad Pitt lost? | Will Penelope Cruz fall into Carmen Miranda's trap?

March 3, 2009 | 11:17 am

• After winning the lead actor award at the Oscars for "Milk," Sean Penn has joined the campaign to have Harvey Milk's birthday, May 22, recognized as "a day of significance" in California. VARIETY

Woody Allen's "Whatever Works" will open the next Tribeca Film Festival. It's the first movie he's made set in New York City since 2004. HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Anne Thompson reports that the early exit of programmer Peter Scarlet from the Tribeca Film Festival "is an act of protest indeed." THOMPSON ON HOLLYWOOD

Penelope_cruz_carmen_miranda

• "Penelope Cruz won the best supporting actress Oscar for a role that lampooned her foreignness," notes a London paper. "Let's hope she doesn't fall into the trap that claimed Carmen Miranda." GUARDIAN

• There are lots of groans over the news that Ed Zwick will make another movie: "In the Heart of the Sea," based upon the destruction of the ship Essex by a sperm whale in 1820. His last, "Defiance," had high Oscar hopes but crashed after it got panned by Variety, the New York Times and the L.A. Times. Produced for $32 million, it earned only $27 million domestically. Lately, it's becoming popular to bash Zwick movies. The reason: His films have compelling subject matter and are well directed and acted, but they're terribly written. Dialogue is clunky. Characters are cookie-cutter cliches. Zwick should stick to directing, period. For his upcoming flick, he's the co-writer, along with the accomplished Marshall Herskovitz, but that's little reassurance, since together they gave us the clunkily penned "Last Samurai," which also fell far short of Oscar expectations. VARIETY

• While the Oscar success of "Slumdog Millionaire" marks a triumph for films made in India, the local film industry is suffering an all-time low in ticket sales. THE AUSTRALIAN

Oscar consultants are suffering battle fatigue and planning a wrap-up party. L.A. TIMES

• "'Slumdog Millionaire' child star Azharuddin Ismail has fallen ill as fears grow about the psychological state of the two young Indian actors," reports a London paper. TELEGRAPH

Scott Feinberg has been busy counting up fascinating Oscars stats. Here's an interesting factoid, for example: "Slumdog Millionaire" is the 10th best-pic winner that received most of its financing outside the U.S. FEINBERG FILES

• The Associated Press tally is wrong! While reporting on "The Simpsons" being extended two more TV seasons to become the longest-running series in prime-time TV history (surpassing "Gunsmoke"), the wire service counts 22 Emmy victories for that crazy Springfield cartoon clan. Hey, they've actually won 24. Most impressive: 10 of those were for best animated program. "The Simpsons" needs 13 more wins to tie "Frasier" as the weekly series with the most Emmys. ASSOCIATED PRESS

• Wake-up call to the Tonys? The 1993 hit film "Sleepless in Seattle" is coming to Broadway, adapted by original screenwriter Jeff Arch, who's working with composer/lyricist Leslie Bricusse ("Stop the World—I Want to Get Off," "Jekyll & Hyde," '"Victor/Victoria"). The original film was nominated for two Oscars. Arch was up for best original screenplay with co-writers Nora Ephron and David S. Ward (they lost to "The Piano" writer Jane Campion), and the film tune "A Wink and a Smile" was up for best song (losing to Bruce Springsteen's "Philadelphia"). PLAYBILL

• Fox News claims that the TV camera caught Jennifer Aniston snickering at the Oscars when her ex Brad Pitt lost lead actor and also claims you can see Brad being forced to his feet by Angelina Jolie when Kate Winslet beat her for best actress. Yeah, Brad's late getting up when everyone else stands around him, but he claps on cue when the winner's announced and, a short time later, he does rise. See the top video below. As for Jennifer, well, judge for yourself. See the bottom video. She's sitting right behind Sean Penn. She smiles when he wins. It's kind of a tilted, crooked smile. Is it really a snicker? FOX NEWS

Photos: The Weinstein Co., 20th Century Fox

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Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie could be latest couple cursed at the Oscars

February 20, 2009 |  6:06 pm

For both Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, the only speech they really need to rehearse for Sunday's Oscars is what to say when they run into his ex-wife Jennifer Aniston. After all, both Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are ranked by Gold Derby fourth in their respective lead races for "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" and "Changeling."

And the track record of couples both nominated for Oscars in the same year is not great. Of the 11 couples profiled below, only one — Frances McDormand and Joel Coen — both won on the same night. In four other derby years, the woman won while, in one instance, it was the man. And for the five others — including the most recent pairing of Heath Ledger and Michelle Williams in 2005's "Brokeback Mountain" — both of them lost.

Oscars_ethan_coen_frances_mcdorma_2

In 2005 Ledger and Williams met while making "Brokeback Mountain." He lost the lead actor race to Philip Seymour Hoffman ("Capote") while she lost the supporting actress Oscar to Rachel Weisz ("The Constant Gardener").

In 1996, Joel Coen directed his wife Frances McDormand for the fifth time in "Fargo." She won her only lead actress bid (she has lost three supporting races) and he earned his first directing nod. While he lost that race to Anthony Minghella who helmed best picture champ "The English Patient" he shared the original screenplay Oscar with his brother Ethan Coen.

In 1995 Tim Robbins directed his partner Susan Sarandon to the lead actress Oscar in "Dead Man Walking." While Sarandon won on her fifth and, to date, final bid, Robbins lost his only helming nod to another actor turned director Mel Gibson who won for making best picture champ "Braveheart." Robbins would go on to win the supporting actor Oscar in 2003 for "Mystic River" which was directed by the ultimate crossover Clint Eastwood.

In 1968 Paul Newman directed his first film "Rachel, Rachel" with wife Joanne Woodward in the title role. Woodward lost the second of her four lead actress bids — she won with her first in 1957 for "The Three Faces of Eve" — to both Katharine Hepburn ("The Lion in Winter") and Barbra Streisand ("Funny Girl"). Newman was nominated for producing this best picture contender which lost to "Oliver!" He would go on to win on the seventh of his eight lead actor nods in 1986 for "The Color of Money" and earned a single supporting nod as well. Newman also received an honorary Oscar in 1985 and the Hersholt humanitarian Oscar in 1993.

Burton_taylor_virginia_woolf_oscars

In 1967 Katharine Hepburn won the the second of her record four lead actress awards for "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" which was her final film with off-screen love Spencer Tracy. She always thought of this award as a tribute to Tracy, who died just days after filming finished on their ninth on-screen collaboration. Tracy lost his ninth and final lead actor race. He had won back-to-back Oscars in 1937 and 1938 for "Captains Courageous" and "Boys Town" respectively. "Dinner" was the only film they made together in which they were both nominated but Hepburn picked up the third of her 12 lead actress nods for their first collaboration "Woman of the Year" in 1942.

In 1966 husband and wife Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor contended in the lead races for "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" Taylor won the second of her two lead actress Oscars — the first was in 1960 for "Butterfield 8" — on her fifth and final nod. Burton lost the fifth of his seven nods to Paul Scofield ("A Man for All Seasons"). Burton shared the title of Oscar's biggest loser with his drinking buddy Peter O'Toole until O'Toole worsted him with his loss for "Venus" two years ago.

In 1963, Rex Harrison lost the first of his two lead actor bids for "Cleopatra" to Sidney Poitier ("Lilies of the Field") while wife Rachel Roberts lost her only best actress nod to Patricia Neal ("Hud"). Harrison would win the following year for reprising his stage role of Henry Higgins in best picture champ "My Fair Lady."

In 1957 husband and wife Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester were nominated for "Witness for the Prosecution." Laughton — already a lead actor champ for 1933's "The Private Life of Henry VIII" — lost the third of his three lead actor bids to Alec Guinness ("The Bridge on the River Kwai"). Lanchester lost the second of her two supporting actress noms to Miyoshi Umeki ("Sayonara").

In 1953 Ava Gardner successfully petitioned Columbia studio head Harry Cohn to cast her husband Frank Sinatra in "From Here to Eternity." While he won the supporting actor award she lost her only lead actress bid for "Mogambo" to Audrey Hepburn ("Roman Holiday"). Sinatra went on to earn one lead nod and was awarded the Hersholt humanitarian Oscar in 1970.

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Can Amy Adams really pull off an upset at the Oscars?

February 10, 2009 |  3:02 pm

When Tariq Khan makes a bold Oscar prediction, take heed. He's one of the savviest Oscarologists I know and this year he's going where no other guru dares: out onto a thin, shaky limb for Amy Adams ("Doubt") for supporting actress. Interesting call! That category, after all, is where most Oscar upsets happen.

Tariq has one of the best Oscar prediction rates every year. Check out the forecasts he made last year for Fox News — he scored 100%. Earlier this derby season he was one of the first pundits warning us that Kate Winslet might be nommed for "The Reader" instead of "Revolutionary Road."

Below, Tariq makes his argument for Amy Adams, building his Oscar case carefully by citing past award trends and issues at play this year. I dare to disagree with him, though. I think the two points he's not giving enough due are the Babe Factor and the fact that, while, yes, Amy Adams has the most screen time, she doesn't have the big impact scene emotionally that, say, her costar Viola Davis has or even front-runner Penelope Cruz. The Babe Factor boosts Cruz hugely, I think, and it's a trump card that shouldn't be downplayed. Over the last two decades the largely male academy has turned the lead and supporting actress winners' circles into a beauty pageant.

But Tariq has proved me wrong often in the past. Just for Gold Derby readers, he's written out his case below.

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I know that most pundits seem to think that Penelope Cruz in "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" is ahead in the supporting actress race. However, I am going to make a bold prediction: Penelope Cruz will lose to Amy Adams in "Doubt."

I'll admit that I'm not certain about this, the way I felt certain last year that Julie Christie in "Away From Her" would lose to Marion Cotillard in "La Vie en Rose." Still, there are some key historical voting patterns that suggest an upset victory by Adams over Cruz may be likely. Allow me to explain.

An Oscars upset usually happens when two factors are in place: support for the presumed front-runner is softer than people realize and support for another nominee is stronger than people realize.

First, let's take a look at reasons why support for Cruz may be weaker than we think it is.

1.) She lost both the Golden Globe and SAG Awards. True, she lost to Kate Winslet in "The Reader," who isn't competing in this category at the Oscars. But how can one really be a front-runner without winning at least one of the two awards? In the previous 14 years (since the inception of the SAG awards), only nine out 56 nominees have won an acting Oscar without a Globe or SAG win. They are Kevin Spacey in "The Usual Suspects," Juliette Binoche in "The English Patient," James Coburn in "Affliction," Russell Crowe in "Gladiator," Marcia Gay Harden in "Pollock," Denzel Washington in "Training Day," Adrien Brody in "The Pianist," Alan Arkin in "Little Miss Sunshine" and Tilda Swinton in "Michael Clayton." That's a 16% Oscar success race for those with neither a Globe nor SAG victory. It's true that the other four supporting actress nominees this year face the same odds -– but they're the same odds faced by Cruz.

2.) Her film, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," is up for no other awards. Remember the one-nomination wonder factor I used when dismissing the chances of Cate Blanchett in "I'm Not There" and Amy Ryan in "Gone Baby Gone" last year? Well, I'm using it again here. Over the past 15 years, only four actors have won Oscars for films not nominated for any other awards. They are Jessica Lange in "Blue Sky," Angelina Jolie in "Girl, Interrupted," Charlize Theron in "Monster," and Forest Whitaker in "The Last King of Scotland." That's four out of 60 nominees, just under 7%. And Jolie, Theron and Whitaker were all both Globe and SAG champs, while Globe winner Lange only lost the SAG race to Jodie Foster in "Nell" because no one had seen her long-shelved "Blue Sky." (The film played in just a handful of theaters for about a week.)

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Free Oscar campaigning on TV

February 5, 2009 | 11:29 am

Over the last week or so you may have noticed the parade of Oscar nominees like Mickey Rourke, Taraji P. Henson and stars of best picture nominee "Slumdog Millionaire" Dev Patel and Freida Pinto on the morning chat programs like "Today," "CBS Early Show" and "Good Morning America." Amazing coincidence? Ha! Well, I've tried valiantly to compile a list of just some of them on similar shows for, well, your consideration. I haven't yet even tallied up their interviews in magazines like Sean Penn's current visit with Rolling Stone.

LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN
2/3 - Richard Jenkins

TONIGHT SHOW WITH JAY LENO
1/30 - Dev Patel
2/2 - Kate Winslet, Danny Boyle,
2/4 - Penelope Cruz
2/6 - Frank Langella
2/10 - Viola Davis
2/11- Amy Adams

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LATE NIGHT WITH CONAN O'BRIEN
2/5- Taraji P. Henson

LAST CALL WITH CARSON DALY
2/2 - Dev Patel
2/6 - Danny Boyle

CRAIG FERGUSON
1/28 - Freida Pinto

DAILY SHOW WITH JON STEWART
2/3 - Dev Patel

JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE
2/9 - Mickey Rourke
2/10 - Josh Brolin

ABC NIGHTLINE
2/2 - Meryl Streep
2/3 - Angelina Jolie
2/4 - Penelope Cruz

THE VIEW
2/3 - Dev Patel
2/4 - Richard Jenkins
2/11 - Kate Winslet

LIVE WITH REGIS AND KELLY
2/13 - Anne Hathaway

THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW
2/3 - Josh Brolin
2/4 - Penelope Cruz
2/5 - Taraji P. Henson

TAVIS SMILEY (PBS)
2/4 - Sean Penn
2/9 - Melissa Leo


Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie to be among no-show nominees at Oscars luncheon

January 31, 2009 | 12:23 pm

Oscars nominees get together for the annual academy luncheon Monday and 15 of the 20 acting nominees will be among the almost 120 attendees.

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However, missing from the festivities at the Beverly Hilton Hotel will be: Oscars' lead actor contender Brad Pitt, who is busy promoting "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" overseas; his gal pal, lead actress contender Angelina Jolie ("Changeling"), who has gone along for the ride; New York-based Meryl Streep, who just equalled Katharine Hepburn's record dozen lead-actress nods with this bid for "Doubt" (she has a record tally of 15 Oscars noms overall — she was also MIA from this luncheon two years ago when nomm'd for "The Devil Wears Prada"); and Streep's co-star, supporting actor contender Philip Seymour Hoffman.

All five directing nominees — Danny Boyle, Stephen Daldry, David Fincher, Ron Howard and Gus Van Sant — are scheduled to attend, as are many of the Academy Award nominees in the other 18 races. Look for the historic group photo here Monday afternoon.

READ THESE RELATED POSTS

Experts Predict Who'll Win the Oscars

Oscars Ceremony Will Break with Decades-Long Traditions

Here's who our experts predicted would win the Screen Actors Guild Awards

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Oscar nominations follow guild awards as a guide

January 22, 2009 | 11:59 am

This year 18 of the 19 SAG acting nominees are repeating at the Oscars. Since double SAG nominee Kate Winslet was bumped up by the Oscars from supporting to lead for "The Reader," she was denied a lead nom for "Revolutionary Road." However, that film's Michael Shannon managed to knock SAG nominee Dev Patel of "Slumdog Millionaire" out of the supporting race.

Last year 15 of the 20 SAG nominees went on to compete at the Oscars. Two years ago, it was a staggering 19 of the 20 with the one variation coming from the same film — "The Departed" — as SAG nominee Leonardo DiCaprio was replaced at Oscar time by Mark Wahlberg.

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Four of this year's five SAG-nominated ensembles appear in Oscar-nominated best pictures with SAG contender "Doubt" replaced by "The Reader." Last year only one SAG ensemble nominee — "No Country for Old Men" — made it into the best-picture race, although that film won both awards. Two years ago it was three of five, with "Little Miss Sunshine" taking the SAG prize, but losing the top Oscar to "The Departed."

All five of the lead actress nominees are competing for both awards, though Kate Winslet contends at the Oscars for "The Reader" rather than "Revolutionary Road." Last year, it was four of five as the only SAG nominee not needing a babysitter come Oscar night was Angelina Jolie ("A Mighty Heart") whose spot went to "The Savages" star Laura Linney.

The supporting actress race matches up four to five as the promotion of Kate Winslet for "The Reader" left room at the Oscars for the addition of Marisa Tomei ("The Wrestler"). Last year, this race was also four for five with SAG nominee Catherine Keener ("Into the Wild") replaced by Saoirse Ronan of "Atonement."

Lead actor matched up perfectly. Last year, it went three for five with SAG nominees and relative newcomers Emile Hirsch ("Into the Wild") and Ryan Gosling ("Lars and the Real Girl") replaced by Hollywood vets Johnny Depp ("Sweeney Todd") and Tommy Lee Jones ("In the Valley of Elah").

And, as mentioned, the supporting race is four for five with Shannon replacing Patel. Last year SAG nominee Tommy Lee Jones ("No Country") was replaced by Philip Seymour Hoffman ("Charlie Wilson's War").

The DGA picks for best director matched up with four of the five academy choices as DGA nominee Christopher Nolan ("The Dark Knight") was edged out at the Oscars by Stephen Daldry ("The Reader"). Daldry has only helmed three films and has Oscar nods for all of them, the previous two being "Billy Elliot" (2000) and "The Hours" (2002). Last year, DGA nominee Sean Penn ("Into the Wild") lost his Oscar slot to Jason Reitman who helmed best pic nominee "Juno."

The PGA nominees for best picture also went four for five with the Oscar contenders as "The Dark Knight" was bumped by "The Reader." Last year, it was also four for five with PGA nominee "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" replaced by "Atonement."

The WGA nods for original screenplay were shut out save for Dustin Lance Black and his script for "Milk." Last year they lined up with the Oscar nominees except for "Knocked Up" which was knocked out of the competition by the team who whipped up "Ratatouille." However, the adapted screenplay race went four for five with only the WGA nominees for "The Dark Knight" bumped by David Hare, who adapted "The Reader." Last year Sean Penn, who wowed the WGA with his adaptation of "Into the Wild," was snubbed by the Oscars as was the scripter for "Zodiac." They were replaced by "Atonement" adapter Christopher Hampton and first time writer-director Sarah Polley.

The ASC choices for best cinematography lined up with the Oscar nominees except for "Revolutionary Road" shooter Roger Deakins, who was replaced by Tom Stern for "Changeling." Last year the ASC went five for five.

The ACE picks for best editing match those of the Oscars. Last year ACE nominee "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" was replaced by "Michael Clayton."

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Experts predict who'll win the Golden Globes

January 10, 2009 | 12:58 pm

We've assembled a team of pro pundits to predict who'll win the Golden Globes: Thelma Adams (Us Weekly), Scott Bowles (USA Today), Peter Howell (Toronto Star), Dave Karger (Entertainment Weekly), Greg Ellwood (HitFix.com), Marshall Fine (Star Magazine, Hollywood and Fine), Kris Tapley (InContention.com), Brad Brevet (Rope of Silicon), Scott Feinberg (Feinberg Files, The Envelope), Peter Travers (Rolling Stone), Pete Hammond (Notes on a Season, The Envelope), Edward Douglas (Comingsoon.net), T.L. Stanley (Gold Rush, Hollywood Reporter) and me. Read more pundits' predictions at AwardsDaily.com. Check out my detailed analysis of the top categories HERE . Film critic Gene Seymour gives Gold Derby readers his analysis HERE.

GOLDEN GLOBES FILM CATEGORIES

BEST DRAMA PICTURE
"The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" — Douglas, Karger, Travers
"Frost/Nixon"
"The Reader"
"Revolutionary Road"
"Slumdog Millionaire" — Adams, Bowles, Brevet, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Howell, O'Neil, Stanley, Tapley

BEST COMEDY-MUSICAL PICTURE
"Burn After Reading"
"Happy-Go-Lucky" — Adams, Brevet, Stanley, Tapley, Travers
"In Bruges"
"Mamma Mia!" — Fine, Howell, O'Neil
"Vicky Cristina Barcelona" — Bowles, Ellwood, Douglas, Feinberg, Hammond, Karger

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE PICTURE
"The Baader Meinhof Complex"
"Everlasting Moments"
"Gomorrah" — Brevet, Feinberg, Tapley
"I've Loved You So Long" — Adams, Douglas, Fine
"Waltz With Bashir" — Bowles, Ellwood, Hammond, Howell, Karger, O'Neil, Stanley, Travers

BEST DIRECTOR
Danny Boyle, "Slumdog Millionaire" — Adams, Bowles, Brevet, Douglas, Feinberg, Howell, Karger, O'Neil, Stanley, Tapley
Stephen Daldry, "The Reader"
David Fincher, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" — Fine, Ellwood, Hammond, Travers
Ron Howard, "Frost/Nixon"
Sam Mendes, "Revolutionary Road"

BEST DRAMA ACTOR
Leonardo DiCaprio, "Revolutionary Road"
Frank Langella, "Frost/Nixon" — Hammond, O'Neil, Tapley
Sean Penn, "Milk" — Adams, Bowles, Brevet, Douglas, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Stanley, Travers
Brad Pitt, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" — Howell
Mickey Rourke, "The Wrestler" — Karger

Golden_globe_panel3

BEST DRAMA ACTRESS
Anne Hathaway, "Rachel Getting Married" — Brevet, Douglas, Feinberg, Fine, O'Neil
Angelina Jolie, "Changeling"
Meryl Streep, "Doubt" — Ellwood, Hammond, Howell, Tapley, Travers
Kristin Scott Thomas, "I've Loved You So Long" — Stanley
Kate Winslet, "Revolutionary Road" — Adams, Bowles, Karger

BEST COMEDY/MUSICAL ACTOR
Javier Bardem, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" — Brevet, Douglas, Fine, Stanley, Hammond, Howell
Colin Farrell, "In Bruges" — O'Neil
James Franco, "Pineapple Express" — Travers
Brendan Gleeson, "In Bruges"
Dustin Hoffman, "Last Chance Harvey" — Adams, Bowles, Ellwood, Feinberg, Karger, Tapley

BEST COMEDY/MUSICAL ACTRESS
Rebecca Hall, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" — Bowles
Sally Hawkins, "Happy-Go-Lucky" — Adams, Brevet, Douglas, Ellwood, Fine, Hammond, Howell, Karger, Tapley, Stanley, Travers
Frances McDormand, "Burn After Reading"
Meryl Streep, "Mamma Mia!" — Feinberg, O'Neil
Emma Thompson, "Last Chance Harvey"

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Tom Cruise, "Tropic Thunder"
Robert Downey Jr., "Tropic Thunder"
Ralph Fiennes, "The Duchess"
Philip Seymour Hoffman, "Doubt"
Heath Ledger, "The Dark Knight" — Adams, Bowles, Brevet, Douglas, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Howell, Karger, O'Neil, Stanley, Tapley, Travers

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, "Doubt"
Penelope Cruz, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" — Adams, Brevet, Douglas, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Howell, Karger, Stanley, Tapley, Travers
Viola Davis, "Doubt" — Bowles
Marisa Tomei, "The Wrestler"
Kate Winslet, "The Reader" — O'Neil

ANIMATED FILM
"Bolt"
"Kung Fu Panda"
"Wall-E" — Adams, Bowles, Brevet, Feinberg, Douglas, Ellwood, Fine, Hammond, Howell, Karger, O'Neil, Stanley, Tapley, Travers

SCREENPLAY
Simon Beaufoy, "Slumdog Millionaire" — Adams, Bowles, Brevet, Ellwood, Feinberg, Howell, Stanley, Karger
David Hare, "The Reader"
Peter Morgan, "Frost/Nixon"
Eric Roth, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" — Fine, Hammond, O'Neil, Tapley, Travers
John Patrick Shanley, "Doubt" — Douglas

ORIGINAL SCORE
Alexandre Desplat, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" — Ellwood, Douglas, Feinberg, Hammond, Howell, Karger, O'Neil
Clint Eastwood, "Changeling" — Adams
James Newton Howard, "Defiance"
Hans Zimmer, "Frost/Nixon"
A.R. Rahman, "Slumdog Millionaire" — Brevet, Bowles, Brevet, Fine, Stanley, Tapley

SONG
"Down to Earth" (performed by Peter Gabriel, written by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman), "Wall-E" — Adams, Howell
"Gran Torino" (performed by Clint Eastwood, Jamie Cullum, Kyle Eastwood, Michael Stevens, lyrics by: Kyle Eastwood, Michael Stevens), "Gran Torino"
"I Thought I Lost You" (performed by Miley Cyrus and John Travolta, written by Miley Cyrus and Jeffrey Steele), "Bolt" — Hammond
"Once in a Lifetime" (performed by Beyoncé, written by Beyoncé Knowles, Amanda Ghost, Scott McFarnon, Ian Dench, James Dring, Jody Street), "Cadillac Records"
"The Wrestler" (performed by Bruce Springsteen, written by Bruce Springsteen), "The Wrestler" — Bowles, Brevet, Douglas, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Karger, O'Neil, Stanley, Tapley, Travers

GOLDEN GLOBES TELEVISION CATEGORIES

DRAMATIC TV SERIES
"Dexter" — Tapley
"House M.D."
"In Treatment" — Ellwood
"Mad Men" — Bowles, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Karger, O'Neil, Travers
"True Blood"

BEST ACTOR, TV DRAMA
Gabriel Byrne, "In Treatment" — Ellwood
Michael C. Hall, "Dexter" — O'Neil, Tapley
Jon Hamm, "Mad Men" — Bowles, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Karger, Travers
Hugh Laurie, "House M.D."
Jonathan Rhys Meyers, "The Tudors"

BEST ACTRESS, TV DRAMA
Sally Field, "Brothers & Sisters" — Tapley
Mariska Hargitay, "Law & Order: SVU"
January Jones, "Mad Men" — Bowles
Anna Paquin, "True Blood" — Hammond, Ellwood, Karger, O'Neil, Travers
Kyra Sedgwick, "The Closer" — Feinberg, Fine

TV SERIES, MUSICAL OR COMEDY
"Californication"
"Entourage"
"The Office"
"30 Rock" — Bowles, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Karger, O'Neil, Tapley, Travers
"Weeds"

BEST ACTOR, TV MUSICAL OR COMEDY
Alec Baldwin, "30 Rock" — Bowles, Ellwood, Feinberg, Fine, Hammond, Karger, Tapley, Travers
Steve Carell, "The Office"
Kevin Connolly, "Entourage"
David Duchovny, "Californication"
Tony Shalhoub, "Monk"

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Golden Globes nominations reax: Don't got 'Milk'?!

December 11, 2008 |  9:13 am

The biggest jaw dropper among the Golden Globe nominations is the omission of "Milk" in the best picture category, of course — just one day after it won that prize from the New York Film Critics Circle. Can it still win at the Oscars? Sure. Twice, Oscar's eligible best pic champs weren't even nommed at the Golden Globes: "Crash" and "The Sting." Besides, we're used to the Oscars and Golden Globes going their own ways recently. The Golden Globes dispense separate kudos for drama and comedy-musical races, which makes comparisons to the Oscars difficult, but in the past 64 years, the Oscars have validated one of the Golden Globe top pics 42 times. Over the past three years, they disagreed on best picture, which is odd. Last year, the Oscars opted for "No Country for Old Men," Globers went for "Atonement." Two years ago: Oscars, "The Departed"; Globes, "Babel". Three years ago: Oscars, "Crash"; Globes, "Brokeback Mountain."

Golden_globe_panel3_2

It's also curious that Cate Blanchett is missing from the lead actress lineup while her costar Brad Pitt got nommed and "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" is up for best pic. A lot of pundits had predicted that the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. would take care of Pitt with a supporting-actor nom for "Burn After Reading" and snub him in lead in favor of Clint Eastwood ("Gran Torino"). However, please note that I didn't fall for that in my predictions! (Voters still took care of Clint in the music categories with two bids.) In the past, Brad won one Globe ("12 Monkeys," 1995) out of three nominations. Cate Blanchett has won two Globes for seven nominations: lead drama actress for "Elizabeth" (1998); and supporting for "I'm Not There" (2007).

Since Angelina Jolie got nommed for "Changeling," that means both halves of Brangelina will be at the Globes. Too bad Jennifer Aniston didn't make the list for "Marley & Me." She was considered to be a serious contender in the comedy-musical race for lead actress.

Other notable acting snubs in the film races at the Golden Globes:

Will Smith, "Seven Pounds"
Melissa Leo, "Frozen River"
Josh Brolin, "Milk"
James Franco, "Milk"
Dev Patel, "Slumdog Millionaire"
Richard Jenkins, "The Visitor"

Globers are so crazy for musicals that if a successful one gets nominated it almost always wins the best pic prize. Consider these champs of recent years: "Sweeney Todd," "Dreamgirls," "Walk the Line," "Chicago," "Moulin Rouge!" and "Evita." Heck, they even nominated flops like "The Producers" and "Phantom of the Opera." So there was a chance that they might give a top slot to super-hit "High School Musical 3: Senior Year." I'd heard ahead of time from trusty Globe sources that that was unlikely, but some said that the HFPA might toss Zac Efron a bone. That didn't happen either, though. Whazzup? Don't Globers like bubblegum?

Lucky that Ben Stiller has a good sense of humor. He got snubbed for his "Tropic Thunder" but got upstaged by supporting stars Robert Downey Jr. and, in an uncredited role, Tom Cruise

Photo credit: Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.

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Updated Oscars predix: 'Slumdog' nipping at heels of 'Benjamin Button'

November 29, 2008 |  9:23 pm

Pundits are constantly updating their Oscars predix at the Envelope's Buzzmeter, so remember to keep checking back often. (Bookmark THIS LINK for quick access in the future.)

Meryl_streep_doubt1_edited1

Below is a sampling of newest predix from top gurus, who include Pete Hammond (Notes on a Season, The Envelope), Peter Howell (Toronto Star), Dave Karger (Entertainment Weekly), Lou Lumenick (New York Post), Sasha Stone (AwardsDaily.com), Jeff Wells (Hollywood-Elsewhere.com) and moi.

Notice how close the battle is over best picture. While four of these seven seers pick "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," two of us naysayers back "Slumdog Millionaire" and one opts for "Milk." All four "Button" backers put "Slumdog Millionaire" in second place. I — a "Slumdog" supporter — list "Button" as the runner-up."

Views are split over best actor: three votes for Frank Langella ("Frost/Nixon"), two for Mickey Rourke ("The Wrestler"), one for Sean Penn ("Milk") and one for Leo DiCaprio ("Revolutionary Road").

Kate Winslet ("Revolutionary Road") zooms ahead of previous front-runner Meryl Streep ("Doubt") with four votes to one. Streep even falls behind Kristin Scott Thomas ("I've Loved You So Long"), who has two votes.

BEST PICTURE Hammond Karger Stone Wells Howell Lumenick O'Neil
'Australia'

5

 

         
'Benjamin Button'

1

1

1

3

2

2

'Dark Knight'

 

 

3

 

3

 

 

'Doubt'

 

5

 

5

 

 

 

'Frost/Nixon'

3

3

 

 

5

 

3

'Gran Torino'

 

 

 

 

 

5

 
'Milk'

4

 

4

4

 

1

'Revolutionary Road'

 

4

5

2

4

4

5

'Slumdog Millionaire'

2

2

2

1

2

3

1


BEST ACTOR Hammond Karger Stone Wells Howell Lumenick O'Neil
Leo DiCaprio, 'Revolutionary Road  

4

5

1

5

4

Clint Eastwood, 'Gran Torino'

3

5

4

 

 

3

5

Richard Jenkins,

'The Visitor'

4

 

 

 

5

 

Frank Langella, 'Frost/Nixon'

1

3

2

2

1

2

1

Sean Penn, 'Milk'

3

2

3

5

2

1

2

Brad Pitt, 'Benjamin Button'

5

 

 

 

3

   
Mickey Rourke, 'The Wrestler'

 

1

1

4

3

3


BEST ACTRESS Hammond Karger Stone Wells Howell Lumenick O'Neil
Anne Hathaway, 'Rachel Getting Married'

 

3

4

5

3

3

3

Cate Blanchett,

'Benjamin Button'

4

 

5

3

   

4

Angelina Jolie, 'Changeling'

5

5

 

 

5

4

 

Sally Hawkins,

'Happy-Go-Lucky'

 

       

 

5

Melissa Leo,

'Frozen River'

 

   

4

     
Meryl Streep, 'Doubt'

2

2

2

 

1

2

2

Kristin Scott Thomas, 'I've Loved You So Long'

1

4

3

1

4

5

 

Kate Winslet, 'Revolutionary Road'

3

1

1

2

2

1

1

Photo: Miramax


POLL: Who'll win the Oscar for best actress?

November 24, 2008 |  8:51 am

In the best-actress derby right now there seem to be two good bets for nominations: Meryl Streep ("Doubt") and Kate Winslet ("Revolutionary Road" or "The Reader"), but one of them is actually vulnerable. (More on that later.) Anne Hathaway looks likely, but — ummm — she's not quite a slam dunk. She just got a nice boost this past week, though, when Sony Pictures Classic shipped DVDs of "Rachel Getting Married" to Oscar voters before the Thanksgiving rush.

Other rivals with the best hope of snagging a nom probably come from this batch of five contenders: Cate Blanchett ("The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"), Sally Hawkins ("Happy-Go-Lucky"), Angelina Jolie ("Changeling"), Nicole Kidman ("Australia") and Kristin Scott Thomas ("I've Loved You So Long"). Outside shots: Melissa Leo ("Frozen River"), Michelle Williams ("Wendy and Lucy"), Kate Beckinsale ("Nothing but the Truth"), Emma Thompson ("Last Chance Harvey") and Penelope Cruz ("Elegy").

Meryl_streep_kate_winslet_anne_hath

Cate Blanchett has two things going for her. First, she stars in what many Oscar gurus consider to be the best-picture front-runner, which is always a plus. Secondly, academy members adore her so much personally that they seem to nominate Cate Blanchett for anything, even two films they didn't like last year ("Elizabeth: The Golden Age," "I'm Not There"). However, the "Benjamin Button" roles played by Blanchett and costar Brad Pitt are rather emotionally passive. They don't showcase the kind of theatrical grandstanding that voters often like to see.

What about Angelina Jolie? Last year she seemed like a shoo-in for a bid after scoring strong critical reviews for "A Mighty Heart." She got nominated by virtually every other award (Golden Globe, SAG, Critics Choice, Indie Spirit), but, alas, got snubbed by Oscar. Part of that was probably the fault of the film's subject matter, which was shrugged off widely by academy members. Other movies about the Mideast war fell short of Oscar expectations too ("In the Valley of Elah," "Charlie Wilson's War"). Also, it was a summer release that bombed in theaters. It helps that "Changeling" is a late-year release, closer to Oscar voting, but it also was a financial disappointment. Produced for $55 million, "Changeling" reaped only $34 million worldwide ($29.7 million U.S., $4.4 million global).

Jolie hasn't been nominated since she won in the supporting race in 1999 ("Girl, Interrupted"). It's possible that Hollywood is punishing her for her tabloid life, but she continues to gain respect in the public's eyes. According to the New York Times, "Jolie's Q score, a measurement of a star's likability, has continued to increase. Around the time she won her Oscar, 13% of people surveyed viewed her positively, according to Marketing Evaluations. The average rating for female stars is 18%. Today, about 24% of respondents view Jolie positively."

Nicole Kidman gives a truly winning performance in "Australia," looming luminously over virtually every scene in the 2-hour, 35-minute epic. She got nominated the last time she starred in a Baz Luhrmann pic ("Moulin Rouge!"). Both films are unapologetically campy and, ahem, overly theatrical, but "Moulin Rouge!" didn't pretend to be serious. "Australia" plays it straight, with occasional winks to the audience. Its lighthearted touches may detract from its seriousness in the eyes of notoriously pretentious voters. Nicole doesn't need to win over the whole acting branch, though. She just needs a goodly chunk of No. 1 votes from a faithful minority in order to be nominated and, based upon the fanatically enthusiastic response of some viewers like Oprah Winfrey, Nicole may get those.

Kate_beckinsale_michelle_williams_e

Film critics are all gushing over Kristin Scott Thomas ("I've Loved You So Long"), who was nominated for best actress for "The English Patient" (1996). That means she'll have a strong rooting contingent too. It helps that her performance is in French, just like that of last year's winner, Marion Cotillard ("La Vie en Rose") — that gives it snob appeal. But I think Kristin Scott Thomas has the same problem that Richard Jenkins ("The Visitor") faces in the best-actor race. Both performances are extremely reserved. We observe the anguish that their characters suffer, but it's deeply internalized. Not until late in their movies do we see any emotional fireworks, each expressed in one sole scene. Is that enough?

I think that a lot of Oscar pundits are mistakenly downplaying the chances of Sally Hawkins ("Happy-Go-Lucky"). Curiously, she has the same problem as Kristin Scott Thomas, but in a different way. She also has only one big, flashy eruption late in her movie, but before then, instead of being emotionally reserved all the time, she's unflaggingly perky. Almost annoyingly so. But that also makes her enormously appealing and lovable to many viewers, which boosts her rooting factor. Voters who might be tempted to dismiss her constant chirpiness as fluffy thesping may shrug that off because her flick has snooty art-house credentials. It's directed by Mike Leigh, whose past films paid off with best-actress nominations for Imelda Staunton ("Vera Drake") and Brenda Blethyn ("Secrets and Lies").

Lucky for Melissa Leo, "Frozen River" was the first DVD screener sent to voters this derby season back in late September. Her performance is dynamic and worthy of an Oscar nom, yes, but frankly, the character is haggard — not sexy to many of those older dudes in the academy who usually prefer babes. That's cruel to say — sorry — but it's true. Still, there have been many exceptions to that voter trend in the past, of course — like Staunton and Blethyn — but Leo probably needs the same boost that those gals got: a top award from one of the early, prestigious film critics' groups.

Michelle Williams' critically praised performance will get serious attention this derby season thanks to sympathy in the aftermath of Heath Ledger's tragic death, but many Oscar pundits believe the plot of "Wendy and Lucy" is too lightweight. They just don't care if Wendy (Williams) gets reunited with her dog Lucy after it's tossed in the pound.

There are other serious contenders too, but the software of our Envelope poll only permits 10 entries, so I had to curtail the list.

Penelope Cruz is aces in "Elegy," which was sent via DVD to the academy's acting branch in October, but most Oscar gurus think that she's such a stand-out as a gun-toting crazed ex-lover in "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" that she'll be considered chiefly for that role in the supporting slot.

Kate Beckinsale gives the performance of her career as a journo who goes to jail to keep her sources secret in "Nothing but the Truth," and she got lots of praise from film critics who first saw the film at the Toronto fest in September, but early Oscar buzz isn't strong. That's probably because the film doesn't open in theaters till late next month, which is a mistake. Little, struggling indie flicks like this need to get out early in the derby in order to build traction. That didn't used to be the case, but it's been true ever since the Oscars moved up from March to February in 2003. Now it seems that only the big, high-profile pics can debut so late.

Art-house flick "Wendy and Lucy," which debuts in theaters on Dec. 10, may also pay a terrible price for lateness, but Michelle Williams gets special notice now because of her personal back story.

Even though Emma Thompson is a past Oscar fave, I think she may be penalized for the late release of "Last Chance Harvey" (Dec. 25) too. She gives a soulful performance as a lonely middle-aged gal aching for love, but the best-actress category is crowded this year and the film may not stand out as being special enough to merit the attention of voters scrambling to see dozens of other films before they get nomination ballots about the time "Harvey" hits theaters.

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OSCARS PREDIX: Hey, Meryl Streep — Watch out for Kate Winslet!

November 11, 2008 | 11:55 am

Meryl_streep_kate_winslet

"The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," "Slumdog Millionaire" and "The Dark Knight" assume the win, place and show positions in the Oscars' race for best picture, according to our latest batch of prognosticators: Brad Brevet (Rope of Silicon), Anthony Breznican (USA Today), Peter Howell (Toronto Star), Mark Olsen (The Envelope), Jeffrey Sneider (The Insneider, contributor to Variety), Kris Tapley (InContention.com) and Tom Tapp (TheDailyBeast.com).

Tied for first place in the best actor race with two votes each are Frank Langella ("Frost/Nixon"), Sean Penn ("Milk") and Mickey Rourke ("The Wrestler"). Meryl Streep ("Doubt") remains ahead in the actress' contest, but Kate Winslet ("Revolutionary Road") has gained so much momentum in recent days that she's in solid second place, bumping Anne Hathaway ("Rachel Getting Married").

Compare these predix to others we pooled recently from other Oscar seers HERE, HERE and HERE.

BEST PICTURE Brevet Breznican Olsen Howell Tapp Sneider Tapley
'Benjamin Button'

1

5

1

 1

1

1

'Changeling'

   

 

       
'Dark Knight'

5

3

 

 3

4

 

 

'Doubt'

 

 

5

 

 

3

 

'Frost/Nixon'

 

1

4

 5

 

5

4

'Gran Torino'

 

4

   

2

   
'Milk'

2

 

2

 

3

 

3

'Revolutionary Road'

3

 

3

 4

5

2

5

'Slumdog Millionaire'

4

2

 

 2

 

 

2

'The Wrestler'          

4

 

BEST ACTOR Brevet Breznican Olsen Howell Tapp Sneider Tapley
Leo DiCaprio, 'Revolutionary Road    

5

5

   

3

Clint Eastwood, 'Gran Torino'

3

2

 

 

1

 

3

Richard Jenkins,

'The Visitor'

5

3

 

 

 

5

 

Frank Langella, 'Frost/Nixon'

4

1

4

1

5

4

4

Sean Penn, 'Milk'

2

5

1

2

3

2

1

Brad Pitt, 'Benjamin Button'

 

 

3

2

 

 

Mickey Rourke, 'The Wrestler'

1

4

2

4

4

1

2


BEST ACTRESS Brevet Breznican Olsen Howell Tapp Sneider Tapley
Anne Hathaway, 'Rachel Getting Married'

3

 

3

3

4

5

2

Cate Blanchett,

'Benjamin Button'

   

 

 

3

   
Angelina Jolie, 'Changeling'

5

1

 

5

5

 

5

Nicole Kidman,

'Australia'

 

2

5

   

4

 
Meryl Streep, 'Doubt'

2

3

1

1

1

3

3

Kristin Scott Thomas, 'I've Loved You So Long'

1

5

4

4

 

1

4

Kate Winslet, 'Revolutionary Road'

4

4

2

2

2

2

1


 


Photos: Miramax, Paramount Vantage


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