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Category: CMA Awards

Gold Derby nuggets: Steve Pond digs into documentary race | Guy Lodge on category fraud | Guests line up for Conan O'Brien

October 21, 2010 |  5:10 pm

Steve Pond delves into the selection process for the documentary feature Oscar race. As he reports, "in a remarkable year for non-fiction filmmaking of all kinds, the looming possibility of more Oscar-doc controversies means it’s time to take a look at a process in which: films are judged by surprisingly few people; the most active filmmakers are ineligible or unable to vote; and the final slate of nominees is almost invariably made up of issue-oriented docs — to the exclusion of the odder, entertaining works that make the field so vital these days." THE WRAP

Sasha Stone finds much to quote from the script for "The Social Network," leading off her list of favorite lines of dialogue with this one: "Let’s gut the nerd." AWARDS DAILY

Caitlin King says, "Gwyneth Paltrow will be taking the stage at next month's Country Music Association Awards as a performer. She'll sing the title track of her new movie, 'Country Strong,' and will be joined by Vince Gill." AP

• From London, Mark Shenton reports, "Four days of performances for Andrew Lloyd Webber's 'Love Never Dies,' the sequel to 'The Phantom of the Opera,' have been taken off sale at London's Adelphi Theatre for the week commencing Nov. 22. Performances are set to resume Nov. 26. During the shutdown, revisions will be made to the show. A spokesman said, 'Some changes were written up over the summer and destined for the Australian production and as they make improvements to the show we'd be mad not to put them into the Adelphi [production in London].'" PLAYBILL

The Kids are All RightGuy Lodge asks, "Is Focus right to campaign both Annette Bening and Julianne Moore as leads in 'The Kids Are All Right,' or would it be more appropriate (and tactical) for one to drop to supporting? Can Lesley Manville be declared a lead in 'Another Year' when her character flits around two more constant — but also more passive — presences in the film? Will 'True Grit' newcomer Hailee Steinfeld be the victim of the unwritten campaigning rule stating that minors are, by definition, supporting players — whether they’re carrying a film on their shoulders or not?" IN CONTENTION

Peter Knegt takes a closer look at the Gotham Awards nominations. "Handed out by Independent Feature Project (IFP) for the past twenty years, they have always offered an interesting and generally deserving batch of nominations. But they are also quite inconsistent both category to category and year to year, which to some degree makes them a bit difficult to prove a stable predictor of anything beyond them." INDIE WIRE

Jeff Wells reports from a screening of "Love and Other Drugs" that "Hathaway's performance is the killer, and it is, I suppose, because you can read every emotional tick and tremor on her face, and because your heart goes out to any character coping with a debilitating disease (stage-one Parkinson's) and who wants to keep herself aloof and in control. But Gyllenhaal gives his most winning performance ever — not the deepest or darkest or saddest, perhaps, but 100% likable with no audience-alienation issues except for emotional avoidance. They're quite a pair, these two. All you want is to see them keep it together and somehow make it work." HOLLYWOOD ELSEWHERE

Jean Bentley has the lineup of bold-faced names who will appear on the first week of Conan O'Brien's new TBS talker: "The first episode of Coco's new late night talk show will feature Seth Rogen and musical guest Jack White, along with the winner of the first guest poll — a hotly contested competition between The Pope, Jack Nicholson, Vladimir Putin, REO Speedwagon, The Sultan of Brunei, Justin Bieber, Thomas Pynchon, Gerhard Ertl, Arlene Wagner, Lady Gaga, the cast of the live-action 'Fat Albert' movie and Tom from MySpace to decide the first guest. Nov. 9 will feature Tom Hanks (fittingly, Hanks was the last guest on the O'Brien-hosted 'Tonight Show'), Jack McBrayer (another Coco pal) and Soundgarden. Nov. 10 will see Jon Hamm, Charlene Yi and Fistful of Mercy, and Nov. 11 will feature Michael Cera, Julie Bowen and comedian Jon Dore. TV SQUAD

• Writes Jenelle Riley,"Here's some video of the 'Conviction' Q&A we did with Sam Rockwell a couple weeks ago. The film opened in 11 theaters last weekend, averaging $10,000 per theater — a figure that is either pretty good or a complete disaster, depending on whose hype you believe. What's most important is that everyone I've spoken to who's actually seen the movie has high praise, particularly for Rockwell, who still looks like the one to beat for Best Supporting Actor come awards time." BACKSTAGE

• "South Park" skewered "Inception" on Wednesday night's episode and, as Brian Rafterty notes, "a DiCaprio doppelgänger tried to make sense of the film's dream-warrior premise. 'You just don't get it, 'cause you're not smart enough!'" VULTURE

Photo: Annette Bening, left, and Julianne Moore in "The Kids are All Right." Credit Focus Features.

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Miranda Lambert in seven CMA races including three against fiance Blake Shelton

September 1, 2010 |  2:45 pm

Miranda Lambert Blake Shelton CMA Awards Miranda Lambert will contend in seven of the 12 categories at the upcoming 44th annual CMA Awards airing on ABC Nov. 10. Lambert's nominations include album, female vocalist, song, musical event and the big prize of entertainer of the year. Double nods in both single and music video of the year bring her nomination haul up to nine. In both of those races, her competition includes her beau Blake Shelton and the lovebirds also face off for best musical event. Shelton is also nominated for male vocalist.

By equaling the achievement of Merle Haggard back in 1970, Lambert established a new benchmark for nominations for a female artist. The overall record was set by Alan Jackson with 10 nominations in 2002.

Among Lambert's competition for the coveted title of entertainer of the year is the trio Lady Antebellum, which also contends for album, single, vocal group and music video. The Zac Brown Band is up for both the entertainer and new artist prizes, the first act to pull off this double play since Ricky Skaggs in 1982. The boys in the band also vie for vocal group and musical event.

The entertainer race also includes CMA co-host Brad Paisley, who contends as well for male vocalist (he has won the last three years) and video. Paisley’s bids this year push his career total to 52 and he jumps from No. 5 to No. 3 on the overall list ranking behind only Alan Jackson (79) and George Strait (81). Strait earned the latest two of that record haul this year with noms for male vocalist and album. In 27 years, Strait has only been shut out of CMA Awards nominations two times, in 1992 and 2006.

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Poll: Will Carrie Underwood or Taylor Swift have the longer career?

June 18, 2010 |  2:44 pm

Carrie Underwood Taylor Swift CMT Music AwardsCarrie Underwood and Taylor Swift remain relatively evenly matched when it comes to award hardware. Over the last five years, both of these women have won their share of kudos decided upon by both the public and the industry.

In their showdown at last week's CMT Music Awards, Carrie Underwood won over the public, taking the top honor of video of the year for "Cowboy Casanova" and also scoring the performance prize for her rendition of "Temporary Home" on the CMT show "Invitation Only." Taylor Swift went home empty-handed despite three nominations, including bids for video of the year and female video for "You Belong to Me."

At the Academy of Country Music Awards in April, Underwood prevailed as entertainer of the year for the second year in a row. Swift lost all five of her bids, even though she was coming off big wins at both the Grammys (album of the year) and the Country Music Assn. Awards (entertainer of the year, album of the year, best female vocalist). However, she could not convince a combination of ACM members and online voters to give her that one prize missing from her mantle.

In a recent poll, our readers thought Carrie Underwood the better singer over Taylor Swift by a margin of more than two to one. However, talent is only one factor in the continued success of a performer. The public can be fickle, and what works today can seem tired tomorrow. Country crooners tend to have longer careers than their pop counterparts. Yet even among the Nashville set, stars can burn out quickly (Gretchen Wilson) or fade away (Shania Twain).

Photos: Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood at the 9th annual CMT Music Awards. Credit: Getty Images.

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Carrie Underwood crushes Taylor Swift in talent poll

June 18, 2010 | 12:50 pm

Taylor Swift Carrie Underwood CMA AwardsSince Carrie Underwood trounced Taylor Swift at last week's CMT Music Awards, there has been a heated debate among our readers as to who is the better singer.

Almost 10,000 people voted in a poll asking which of these two songbirds was the biggest talent. Carrie Underwood was the clear winner, taking 63% of the vote. Taylor Swift ran a distant second at 30%, with 5% of readers unable to choose between the two and 2% opting for another singer as their favorite.

As comments on this post topped 250, the following are just a small sample:

kb:The key word here is 'talent' and that's where Carrie Underwood is the winner, hands down! Taylor Swift shouldn't even be mentioned with the word 'talent' in the same sentence. Has anyone besides me ever even listened to her weak, screeching voice? Like fingernails on a chalkboard! UGH!!

nicole: They're both great. But Taylor has it all. She's much younger than Carrie and she can actually right her own songs. Yeah, she's not the best singer, but she's the most emotional singer. And Taylor Swift is the only person I know who would have a 13 hour meet and greet. She cares for her fans MUCH more than Carrie. MUCH more.

Katie: Taylor is not in Carrie's league, vocally. No competition. The fact that Taylor wins Vocalist awards is maddening.

g jenkins: Taylor has it all. She can write, sing and show a purity to her being. She gives evenyone a sence of what a true sweetheart is! Not trashy......Taylor stay true to yourself as this will pay off in the long run.

Irene: Carrie by far. She is the real deal.she has a beautiful voice and very pretty. I would vote for her anytime. I think Reba is the queen and Carrie is the princess right now. Carrie will be queen.

matt: you cant compare the two, taylor is a great writer decent singer, carrie is a great singer decent writer, it just depends on what you look for, they are both great and you cant really say one is lesser

Terri: Neither one is qualified to be Queen of country--Taylor is so young & yes sings off key! None of the currently popular girls will EVER compare to Shania, Leeann or Faith. This is not a high School cheerleading contest. Country music has become very boring. And--George Strait is STILL the man!!!!

Photos: Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood at the 2009 CMA Awards. Credit: ABC

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Poll: Is Taylor Swift or Carrie Underwood the bigger talent?

June 11, 2010 |  1:22 am

Taylor Swift Carrie Underwood CMA Awards Since Carrie Underwood came roaring back to defeat Taylor Swift at Wednesday's CMT Music Awards, there has been a heated debate among our readers as to who is the bigger talent.

The two singers are fairly evenly matched when it comes to awards hardware. However, as seen by this sampling of comments about the original post, opinion remains divided as to who is the true queen of country music:

Jen: The only reason that Taylor won so may awards this past season was due to the sympathy vote after the Kanye outburst. Carrie is oh so deserving of these awards and so many more. Carrie is a true American idol.

Mark Raymond Cubbage: I do believe Taylor should have won, not Carrie. Like Taylor or not, "You Belong With Me" was one of the biggest sensations of the year. Everyone from country to pop was covering it and it never seemed to leave CMT. "Cowboy Casanova" went almost unnoticed. The only reason Carrie won is because she is currently active with a new release, whereas Taylor is in the "writing" stage. Had she just released a new single, chances are she would have won for sure. After awhile, all of Underwood's songs begin to have the same rhythm. Anyone else notice?

CLM: So glad to hear Carrie took the awards. Real tired of hearing Taylor and her teeny bop songs. The title was fitting. Congrats Carrie.

Amanda: Taylor should have won one or all of them. They were very disappointing. Why did she not perform? Those awards were boring. Taylor looked beautiful like always. I dont get why Carrie has been winning the past two award shows. Well when Taylor comes out with her new CD she will be winning again.

Judy: Thank goodness the fans got it right this year. Carrie, is absolutely the Queen of Country Music. She is such a beautiful girl, inside and out. She is just Awesome!!! Congratulations to Carrie and all of the winners!!!

katydid: "Cowboy Casanova" is a very strange song and the video is pretty trashy in my opinion. Carrie has a great voice but I don't think she is all that authentic. Carrie is a product of the industry like her or not. Taylor writes her own songs and has stayed true to who she is. She's so young, just imagine the songs she'll be writing as she matures. I guess voice won over substance.

Add your voice to the ongoing debate and cast your vote in our poll as well.

Photos: Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood at the 2009 CMA Awards. Credit: ABC.

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Taylor Swift, Carrie Underwood vie for ACM entertainer of the year award

March 2, 2010 | 10:10 am

Taylor Swift and reigning champ Carrie Underwood face off against six male artists for the top prize at the 45th annual Academy of Country Music awards on April 18. Three of the men in the race are former winners of entertainer of the year -- Kenny Chesney (2004-2007), Toby Keith (2002, 2003) and George Strait (1989). Another two are multiple male vocalist of the year champs -- Brad Paisley (2006-2008) and Keith Urban (2004, 2005) -- while the final entry -- the Zac Brown Band -- are relative rookies. The ACM entertainer of the year will be determined by online voting as will the four newcomer awards.

Reba McEntire Blake Shelton Academy of Country Music Awards Nominations Perennial ACM host Reba McEntire and Blake Shelton announced the nominations Tuesday morning on CBS' "The Early Show." McEntire -- the 1994 entertainer of the year -- contends this year for female vocalist, an award she has won seven times already. Shelton is vying for vocal event of the year for "Hillbilly Bone."

While Lady Antebellum did not earn an entertainer of the year bid, the group lead with seven other nominations including vocal group, album, single and song. Both Underwood and Miranda Lambert have six nominations while Swift has five.

Expect Swift -- who swept the CMAs last fall with four wins including the coveted entertainer of the year title -- to do just as well at the ACMs. In addition to her entertainer of the year bid, Swift contends for female vocalist and is up for three awards for "You Belong With Me" -- video of the year, song of the year performer and song of the year co-writer.

At last fall's CMAs, Swift ended the three-year reign of Kenny Chesney as the top entertainer. His loss there had been foretold by his defeat for the same award -- after four wins in a row -- at last spring's ACMs to Carrie Underwood. Underwood -- who co-hosted the CMA Awards -- had won female vocalist there for the previous three years but was bested by Swift.

Underwood has won that same award at the ACMs for the last three years and contends again this year. Her CMA co-host, Brad Paisley, won his third consecutive CMA male vocalist prize last fall and is defending his three-year winning streak at the ACMs.

Even the most die-hard country music fans have a tough time explaining the difference between the Country Music Assn. (CMA), which handed out awards last fall, and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), which passes out honors every spring. The only differences besides the dates are network affiliation and geography -- the CMA Awards air on ABC from Nashville; the ACM Awards are doled out on CBS from Las Vegas. Both awards are bestowed by industry organizations with many of the same voters and -- no surprise -- many of the same winners.

In the 45-year history of the ACM Awards, just 23 men and 24 women have won the vocalist prizes. And only 21 different acts have been named entertainer of the year. The CMAs are no different, with many of the champs there having won first at the ACM Awards or vice versa. Over 43 years, the CMA Awards has seen 23 men and 24 women take top vocal honors while 29 different acts have ranked as entertainer of the year.

For the full list of nominees, visit the ACM website.

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Photo: Reba McEntire and Blake Shelton. Credit: CBS

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CMAs and ACMs are country cousins

November 12, 2009 |  9:02 am

Brad Paisley Carrie Underwood CMAs Even the most die-hard country music fans have a tough time explaining the difference between the Country Music Assn. (CMA), which handed out awards Wednesday night, and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), which passes out honors every May. The only differences besides the dates are network affiliation and geography -- the CMA Awards air on ABC from Nashville while the ACM Awards are doled out on CBS from Las Vegas. Both awards are bestowed by industry organizations with many of the same voters and -- no surprise -- many of the same winners.

In the 45-year history of the ACM Awards, just 23 men and 24 women have won the vocalist prizes. And only 21 different acts have been named entertainer of the year. The CMAs are no different, with many of the champs there having won first at the ACM Awards or vice versa. Over 43 years, the CMA Awards have seen 23 men and 24 women take top vocal honors while 29 different acts have ranked as entertainer of the year.

Expect Taylor Swift -- who swept the CMAs this year with four wins including the coveted entertainer of the year title -- to do just as well at the next edition of the ACMs. At the CMAs, Swift beat three-time reigning entertainer of the year Kenny Chesney. His loss there was foretold by his defeat for the same award-- after four wins in a row -- at last May's ACMs, losing to Carrie Underwood.

Underwood -- who co-hosted the CMA Awards -- had won female vocalist there for the last three years, but was bested by Swift this year. However, her co-host, Brad Paisley, picked up his third consecutive male vocalist prize. And Underwood and Paisley have won for the last three years at the ACMs.

The CMA was founded first, in Nashville in 1958, just one year after the Grammy Awards parent organization, the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, was formed in Los Angeles. The association's mission was to serve as an industry think tank and networking organization for Nashville music makers, not to present awards. The first country music kudos were bestowed in 1965 by the upstart new Country and Western Music Academy, formed one year earlier by country artists who had ditched honky-tonk Nashville for the glamour of Hollywood. That group eventually morphed into the ACM. In 1967, the CMA started passing out prizes too.

West Coasters like Merle Haggard dominated the early ACM awards, while Nashville faves Johnny Cash and Charlie Pride swept the CMAs. However, within a decade both groups were honoring the same artists with one exception -- Toby Keith, who's probably been punished by CMA members for not making Nashville his home.

Traditionally, the CMAs have more viewers than the ACMs, but both are so popular that they're aired during sweeps months, and sometimes one or both beat the Nielsen ratings scored by the Emmy Awards. Indeed, the popularity of the CMAs and ACMs ignited an explosion of award shows on TV.

Until 1970, the only major awardscasts were the Oscars, Emmys and Tonys. The Grammys only existed on TV in a rather dull, taped one-hour special billed as "Best on Record." When the CMAs nabbed a spot in prime time, NBC crammed it into its regular weekly "Kraft Music Hall."

Then, in 1971, the Grammys went live in a stand-alone awardscast. When Paul McCartney showed up to accept an award for the busted-up Beatles, the crowd and TV viewing audience went crazy, and ABC had a hit on its hands. Foolishly, however, the alphabet network gave up the broadcast rights to the Grammys just one year later when the recording academy wanted to move the show to Nashville.

CBS not only grabbed the rights to the Grammys but launched a live, stand-alone CMA show. The ACM awardscast was launched in 1972 too. Suddenly, there were three music-award shows on TV at the same time, and all of them scored socko ratings.

Continue reading »

Are the CMA Awards secretly dissing Kenny Chesney?

November 13, 2008 | 12:21 pm

At last night's CMA Awards, it came as no great surprise when Kenny Chesney won entertainer of the year for the fourth time in five years. After all, that top prize tends to reward the artist who's king of the road tour and CD sales. That's Kenny Chesney, who continues to be a top draw on the concert circuit, playing to more than a million people a year while racking up seven platinum albums in the last decade.

In a way, it was fitting that 1999 winner Shania Twain made the presentation. Like Twain, who counts only this one win among her 10 Country Music Assn. kudos nominations, Chesney has little hardware from the CMA beyond these four awards. He has amassed 29 nominations but has managed only three other wins — for recording and producing the 2004 album of the year "When the Sun Goes Down" and for his vocal collaboration last year on "Find Out Who Your Friends Are." Indeed, Chesney has lost male vocalist for seven years running.

Kenny_chesney_cma_awards

The latter fact suggests one ominous possibility. Since the CMA award is the Oscar of the Nashville music scene, it seems to be saying something curious and revealing about what the industry secretly thinks of that beer-chuckin', back-slappin', girl-chasin' good ole boy: They respect Kenny Chesney as someone who can sell CDs and concert seats, but he's not really respected as a vocal artist.

Among those Chesney edged out for the entertainer prize last night were two men who have beaten him in that category: show co-host Brad Paisley, who repeated as male vocalist winner and three-time male vocalist champ Keith Urban, who interrupted Chesney's streak as entertainer of the year with a win in 2005. And while Chesney lost new artist of the year (then known as Horizon award) in 1999 to Jo Dee Messina, Paisley won in 2000, as did Urban the following year.

Chesney also triumphed over George Strait, a five-time male vocalist winner and entertainer of the year in 1989 and 1990. Last night, Strait had to be content with becoming the all-time CMA champ with 22 awards total (out of a staggering 75 nominations). He picked up four trophies as both artist and producer of the best single ("I Saw God Today") and best album of the year ("Troubadour"). While this was only his second single to win after 1996's "Check Yes or No," it was Strait's fifth win for an album after "It Just Comes Natural," 2007; "Carrying Your Love With Me," 1997; "Blue Clear Sky," 1996; and "Does Fort Worth Ever Cross Your Mind," 1985.

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Can Kenny Chesney beat Keith Urban at tonight's CMA Awards?

November 12, 2008 |  9:51 am

Even the most die-hard country music fans have trouble distinguishing between the awards bestowed tonight by the Country Music Assn. (CMA) and the Academy of Country Music (ACM) kudos handed out every May. Both prizes come from industry organizations with many of the same voters and, not surprisingly, many of the same winners.

Tonight's hosts — Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood — were the top vocalists with both groups last year and are competing again this year. The chief differences between the two kudos: The CMAs are based in Nashville and the ceremony is telecast by ABC; the ACMs are based in Hollywood and the show is telecast on CBS. For a list of all the CMA nominees, click here.

Kenny_chesney

Kenny Chesney has taken the top prize of entertainer of the year at the ACMs for four years running and at three of the last four CMAs, including the most recent two. Tonight Chesney competes against 2005 winner Keith Urban, veteran George Strait, hot duo Sugarland and Paisley. Todd Marten takes an in-depth look at this race over at his Pop & Hiss blog. As Todd points out, "touring success and mainstream appeal figures heavily into the prize, and Chesney, according to Pollstar, had the second-highest-grossing tour of 2007, behind only the Police. In July, Billboard speculated Chesney would be near the top again when 2008 figures were tallied." So there is little doubt who will win that CMA trophy again, eh?

While a dozen different prizes will be handed out tonight, the three-hour kudocast devotes a big chunk of time to performances. Among the roster of talent lined up are all five entertainer of the year nominees, as well as four of the female vocalist contenders (Underwood, Miranda Lambert, Martina McBride and Taylor Swift ), male vocalist nominee Alan Jackson (the other four nominees are entertainer of the year contenders), and all five new artist nominees (Jason Aldean, Rodney Atkins, Lady Antebellum, James Otto and Kellie Pickler).

When the CMA was founded 50 years ago in Nashville (one year after the Grammy Awards parent organization, the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, was formed in Los Angeles), the association's mission was to serve as an industry think tank and networking organization for Nashville music makers, not to present awards. Then along came the upstart Country and Western Music Academy, formed in 1964 by country artists who had ditched honky-tonk Nashville for the glamour of Hollywood. That group, which eventually morphed into ACM, started handing out prizes the following year. The CMAs followed suit in 1967, showcasing country talent on NBC's "Kraft Music Hall."

At that time, the only live kudocasts were the Oscars, Emmys and Tonys. The Grammys were presented in a rather dull, taped one-hour special billed as "Best on Record." Then in 1971, the Grammys went live and Paul McCartney showed up to accept an award for the recently busted-up Beatles. Both the crowd and the TV viewing audience went crazy and ABC had an unexpected hit on its hands. Foolishly, however, the alphabet network gave up the broadcast rights one year later when the Grammys wanted to move their show to Nashville. CBS not only grabbed the rights, but also launched a live, stand-alone CMA show. And the ACM award show also began airing in 1972. Suddenly, there were three live music-award shows on TV and all of them scored socko ratings.

Continue reading »

Country cousins: What's the difference between CMA and ACM Awards?

September 11, 2008 | 11:28 am

For even die-hard country music fans explaining the difference between the awards bestowed by the Country Music Assn. (CMA), which announced the nominations for their November kudos Wednesday, and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), which passes out honors every May, is harder than putting lipstick on a pig. The only difference is that the CMAs now air on ABC while the ACMs are on CBS. Both awards are bestowed by industry organizations with many of the same voters and — no surprise — many of the same winners.

For example, Kenny Chesney, who has won the CMA top prize of entertainer of the year for the last two years, competes again this year. And he has won the same award at the ACMs for four years running. Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood were the top vocalists with both groups last year and are competing again at the CMAs.

Cma_awards_acm_awards

CMA was founded first, in Nashville in 1958, just one year after the Grammy Awards parent organization, the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, was formed in Los Angeles. The association's mission was to serve as an industry think tank and networking organization for Nashville music makers, not to present awards. The first country music kudos were actually bestowed in 1965 by the upstart new Country and Western Music Academy, formed one year earlier by country artists who had ditched honky-tonk Nashville for the glamor of Hollywood. That group eventually morphed into ACM. In 1967, CMA started passing out prizes, too.

West Coasters like Merle Haggard dominated the early ACM awards, while Nashville faves Johnny Cash and Charlie Pride swept the CMAs. Nowadays both groups favor the same artists with one odd exception: Toby Keith, who's probably been punished by CMA members for not making Nashville his home.

Another key difference: The ACM Awards are staged in Las Vegas while the CMA Awards usually stay home in Nashville. Traditionally, the CMAs have more viewers than the ACMs but both are so popular that they're aired during sweeps months (May and November) and sometimes one or both beat the Nielsen ratings scored by the Primetime Emmys.

The CMAs and ACMs are responsible in part for the modern explosion of award shows on TV. Before the late 1960s the only awardcasts were the Oscars, Emmys and Tonys. Then the CMAs nabbed a spot in prime time, but NBC crammed it into its regular weekly "Kraft Music Hall." The Grammys only existed on TV in a rather dull, taped one-hour special billed as "Best on Record."

That all changed in 1971, when the Grammys went live in a stand-alone awardcast. When Paul McCartney showed up to accept an award for the busted-up Beatles, the crowd and TV viewing audience went crazy and ABC had a hit on its hands. Foolishly, however, the alphabet network gave up the broadcast rights one year later when the Grammys wanted to move their show to Nashville. CBS not only grabbed the rights, but also launched a live, stand-alone CMA show. The ACM awardscast was launched in 1972 too. Suddenly, there were three music-award shows on TV at the same time and all of them scored socko ratings.

Continue reading »

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