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Category: Farrah Fawcett

Farrah Fawcett missing from 'In Memoriam' at Oscars

March 10, 2010 | 12:35 pm

Farrah Fawcett Extremities Oscars Academy Awards Though Farrah Fawcett's main claim to fame was television, the decision to leave her out of the "In Memoriam" segment of the Oscars has caused quite a stir. Fawcett appeared in 14 feature films in her lifetime. Although she was first featured as eye candy in box-office bombs like "Myra Breckinridge" (1970), she went on to earn a Golden Globe nom for her starring role in "Extremities" (1986) and reap an Indie Spirit bid for her performance opposite Oscar nominee Robert Duvall in "The Apostle" (1997). One of her final film roles was as the estranged wife of Richard Gere in Robert Altman's "Dr. T and the Women" (2000).

Among those overlooked by the academy in addition to Fawcett were Bea Arthur and Gene Barry -- also best known for their TV work -- and Oscar nominee Richard Todd ("The Hasty Heart"). Academy executive director Bruce Davis told People, "There's nothing you can say to people, particularly to family members, within a day or two of the show that helps at all. They tend to be surprised and hurt, and we understand that and we're sorry for it." And he said he thought it more appropriate that Fawcett had been honored for her "remarkable television work" by the Emmys last year.

It is understandable that the academy has to winnow a list of over a hundred possible names down to a manageable number -- 33 this year. However, that time constraint makes the inclusion of Michael Jackson -- who starred in just one film in his lifetime ("The Wiz") -- even more questionable. Surely -- using the same logic as with Fawcett -- the tribute to Jackson at the recent Grammys should have sufficed.

Our forum posters have pointed out this is not the first year for oversights in this Oscars segment. In 2002, Oscar nominees Dorothy McGuire ("Gentleman's Agreement") and Peggy Lee ("Pete Kelly's Blues") were left out while R&B singer Aaliyah, who starred in just one film -- "Romeo Must Die" -- before her death, was featured. And in 2004, Oscar nominee Martha Scott ("Our Town") was not included.

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Photo: "Extremities" DVD cover. Credit: MGM

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Farrah Fawcett could win posthumous Emmy Award

June 25, 2009 | 11:51 am

Farrah Fawcett Farrah's Story Emmy Awards Kate Jackson Jaclyn SmithFarrah Fawcett died today at 62, just shy of six weeks since the airing of "Farrah's Story," the documentary that detailed her courageous battle against cancer. The passing of this one-time "Charlie's Angels" star was rumored to be imminent in the last several days. Viewers who tuned in to "Farrah's Story" last month saw her valiant struggle and may be saddened but not surprised at this news. 


Farrah Fawcett's death was announced just hours before the end of voting to determine the nominees for this year's Emmy Awards. Television's highest honor eluded this small-screen icon who earned three acting Emmy nominations during her three-decade-plus career.

Farrah Fawcett may contend once more for an Emmy Award as an executive producer of "Farrah's Story," which could be nominated as outstanding nonfiction special. It is one of 43 shows in competition for the final five slots on the Emmy ballot. 

Fawcett's longtime friend Alana Stewart produced this intimate, two-hour special. As Stewart told People recently, "It was never meant to be a documentary. Farrah just took her little hand-held camera to the doctor one day." In a twist of fate, it was during that 2007 doctor's visit when Farrah Fawcett was told her cancer had come back.

She had been diagnosed with anal cancer the previous year and thought she had beaten the disease. With conventional treatments no longer working, Fawcett went to Germany to pursue alternative therapies. Fawcett became an outspoken advocate for early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer, and she worked tirelessly to raise the profile of this disease. And by documenting her own struggles in such graphic detail, she made millions aware of the need for testing and research. 

Among those appearing in "Farrah's Story" were her one-time "Charlie's Angels" costars Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith. Farrah Fawcett received the first of her six Golden Globe nominations for the first season of "Charlie's Angels" in 1977 and won the People's Choice Award as favorite newcomer that year.

However, it would not be until 1985 that she earned her first Emmy nod playing a real-life woman who fought back against domestic violence in "The Burning Bed." While Fawcett lost that Emmy race to Oscar champ Joanne Woodward for "Do You Remember Love," she won over TV critics impressed by her acting ability. Fawcett was forever proud of that role and was seen in "Farrah's Story" telling hospital workers she thought of that and her role in "Extremities" – in which she battled a rapist – as the highlights of her career.

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Farrah Fawcett's TV special doesn't really tell her story, producer says

May 16, 2009 |  8:25 pm

The executive producer who's suing to regain creative control of the NBC special "Farrah's Story" says he's putting up a fight because "it's not the show Farrah Fawcett wanted."

In an exclusive, in-depth interview with Gold Derby, Craig Nevius says Farrah Fawcett wanted the program to be presented in a diary format — not in the traditional documentary mode with talking heads, as was used — emphasizing urgent medical and legal issues that got downplayed in the final telecast.

Also, Nevius believes Fawcett would not have OK'd the inclusion of her troubled, 24-year-old son Redmond O'Neal, who is shown in prison uniform and leg chains as he climbs in bed with her, crying, "Mommy…Mommy." Fawcett appears to be so sick that she's oblivious to what's going on.

Farrah fawcett 839275143 news article

Nevius says Fawcett refused to permit her son to be seen in her reality series "Chasing Farrah" on TV Land in 2005, which he also produced. Redmond's battle with drugs was becoming public back then. "He was getting it together and going through counseling at the time," Nevius says. "She didn't want a permanent record on film that would follow him throughout his later life." The only time Redmond's existence was acknowledged on "Chasing Farrah" was when he made one phone call to his mother.

Nevius launched a lawsuit last week claiming that creative control of the TV special was yanked from him six weeks ago by junior producer Alana Stewart, Fawcett's onetime boyfriend Ryan O'Neal and his business manager. "They told NBC that Farrah's in such poor health after returning from her last trip to Germany that 'she's not in a position to finish this and she wants us to finish it,' " Nevius adds.

When NBC granted their request, Nevius was surprised because Fawcett had already planned what should happen if she became too ill to continue to oversee the TV special.  "She had foreseen this possibility and assigned creative control to me," he says. "Last April she signed an agreement empowering me to make the creative decisions." "Farrah's Story," originally titled "Wing and a Prayer," was produced by Fawcett's and Nevius' company, Sweetened by Risk LLC.

Originally, Nevius says that the documentary was acquired by NBC's entertainment division, but it was recently transferred to the network's news division, which rushed to feature it as a special during May sweeps. New footage was hurriedly shot over the last several weeks without his consent, Nevius says, mostly interviews with O'Neal, medical personnel and former "Charlie's Angels" costars Jaclyn Smith and Kate Jackson, who are featured in the final edit. "Farrah hates that TV format," Nevius says. "Everybody who works with her knows that."

The prominence of Smith and Jackson seems a bit odd since Fawcett downplays the significance of "Charlie's Angels" during one scene in "Farrah's Story," reminding nurses, "I was only on the TV show for one season." Were her former costars suddenly jammed into "Farrah's Story" at the last minute to add sex appeal and hike TV ratings?

"I think it would've been fine to have Kate and Jaclyn participate in some stylistically appropriate way and Farrah was never against that," Nevius adds. "In fact, we shot Kate a few times for the first version of the show. The girls have remained friends since starring in 'Charlie's Angels' " in 1976-77.

When Fawcett and Nevius initially developed the TV special, "we had numerous offers from the networks," he says, "and one of the reasons we went with NBC is because they said to Farrah, 'This is your story. We'll tell it your way, in your words.' She was adamant about one thing: She wanted this edited like a movie using her diary for narration. She didn't want the talking-head format with its abrupt interruptions. Also, that changes its point of view."

In addition, he says, Fawcett wanted the TV special to stress important medical issues that ended up getting only passing mention in Friday night's telecast. "Farrah wants to know why chemotherapy sensitivity tests are done in Germany and elsewhere, but not here in America," Nevius says. "This is a huge, huge issue for Farrah and she wants to really, really focus on it."

Fawcett also wanted to explore controversial topics such as why certain experimental drugs are approved by the FDA for just one kind of cancer but not another. "She wants to know: Why do some medicines cost 10 times more in the United States than they do in Germany?" he says. "Aren't we limiting cancer treatment to the rich? 'Why aren't we encouraging mad-scientist thinking?' she likes to ask. Farrah wanted this TV special to have an impact. She wanted this to affect change in the medical world."

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'Farrah's Story': Farrah Fawcett's greatest role

May 15, 2009 |  9:06 pm

"Farrah Fawcett, Executive Producer" flashes on the TV screen in one of the closing shots of "Farrah's Story," which aired Friday night on NBC. That credit may result in earning Farrah Fawcett an industry honor that's eluded her so far — an Emmy Award — thanks to how powerfully and expertly the brave TV special tells the tragic tale of her struggle with cancer.

Farrah fawcett farrah's story news 82935174

Farrah Fawcett hasn't won an Emmy for acting in television series like "Charlie's Angels" or critically hailed TV movies like "The Burning Bed," but "Farrah's Story" could compete at the Emmy Awards as either outstanding nonfiction special or for the juried award for exceptional merit in nonfiction filmmaking.

Fawcett received her first Emmy bid for dramatizing the horrors of domestic violence in "The Burning Bed" (1984), a role she cites — along with "Extremities" (1986), in which she battles a rapist — as the favorites of her career when asked by hospital workers during a scene in "Farrah's Story."

She lost that Emmy race to Oscar champ Joanne Woodward for "Do You Remember Love," but TV critics were wowed by her serious acting chops. That was a key milestone in her career. Next, in 1989, she starred opposite Ryan O'Neal in the miniseries "Small Sacrifices." For her work as a murderous mother, she picked up a second Emmy nod, losing to Barbara Hershey for "A Killing in a Small Town."

In the first half of this decade, Fawcett appeared in multiple episodes of both "Spin City" and "The Guardian," earning her third Emmy nomination for her acclaimed turn on the latter in 2003. She lost that race to Emmy darling Alfre Woodard, who played a defendant on "The Practice."

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Farrah Fawcett faces court battle over 'Farrah's Story'

May 14, 2009 |  2:43 pm

Farrah Fawcett details her fight against cancer in the documentary "Farrah's Story" that is to air Friday night on NBC. Last night, the two-hour special screened at the Paley Center in L.A. with her long-time love Ryan O'Neal introducing the event. Among the most gripping of scenes were those depicting the loss of Fawcett's famous tresses to the effects of chemotherapy.

"Farrah's Story" could compete at the Emmy Awards as either outstanding nonfiction special or for the juried award for exceptional merit in nonfiction filmmaking. But before being judged by Fawcett's TV peers, it seems that the documentary is to be considered by a court of law.

Farrah Fawcett Ryan O'Neal Farrah's Story NBC Emmy Awards TMZ is reporting that Fawcett's one-time producing partner Craig Nevius is "suing for a declaration from the court that he has a binding deal to manage the project. He's also suing for damages." The pair worked together on the 2005 TV Land reality series "Chasing Farrah" and Nevius alleges he was pushed out of this project by O'Neal and Fawcett's friend Alana Stewart, who shot much of the footage.

As Stewart told People last week, "It was never meant to be a documentary. Farrah just took her little hand-held camera to the doctor one day." It was on that 2007 doctor's visit that Farrah Fawcett was told her cancer had come back. She had been diagnosed with anal cancer the previous year and thought she had beaten the disease. With conventional treatments no longer working, Fawcett went to Germany to pursue alternative therapies.

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Farrah Fawcett's TV cancer confession may be Emmy-worthy

May 7, 2009 |  3:30 pm

Farrah Fawcett hasn't won an Emmy for acting in hit TV series like "Charlie's Angels" or critically hailed telefilms like "The Burning Bed," but she may ultimately claim TV's top award for telling her own personal drama in boldly honest terms. In "Farrah's Story," a documentary airing on NBC on May, she shares intimate details of her ongoing battle with cancer..

Her longtime friend Alana Stewart  produced this intimate, two-hour special. As Stewart told People,   "It was never meant to be a documentary. Farrah just took her little hand-held camera to the doctor one day."

Farrah Fawcett News Story 1357924 In a twist of fate, it was during that 2007 doctor's visit when Fawcett was told her cancer had come back. She had been diagnosed with anal cancer the previous year and thought she had beaten the disease. With conventional treatments no longer working, Fawcett went to Germany to pursue alternative therapies.

Her longtime love Ryan O'Neal told People, "At about the halfway point in our trips, the news started to get darker and darker and darker. The hope started to fade. But not for Farrah. She continued fighting. There was always a courage there, and a quiet dignity. Farrah never changed."

Fawcett became an outspoken advocate for early detection and treatment of colo-rectal cancer, She worked tirelessly to raise the profile of this disease. And by documenting her own struggles, she will make viewers aware of the need for testing and research. She narrates the documentary, which includes footage of a recent visit from her son, Redmond O'Neal, who is once again in legal custody on drug-related charges.

"Farrah's Story" could compete at the Emmy Awards as either outstanding nonfiction special or for the juried award for exceptional merit in nonfiction filmmaking. Fawcett received her first Emmy nomination for bringing attention to another important issue — domestic violence — in "The Burning Bed."

Though she lost that race to Oscar-winner Joanne Woodward for "Do You Remember Love," Fawcett was rewarded when TV critics became convinced that she could act. In 1989, she starred opposite O'Neal in the miniseries "Small Sacrifices." For her work as a murderous mother, she picked up a second Emmy nod, losing to Barbara Hershey for "A Killing in a Small Town." Fawcett worked steadily throughout the 1990s, even trying her hand at a short-lived sitcom with O'Neal ("Good Sports") as well as several more feature films. When not acting, she devoted much of her time to her passion for art.

In the first half of this decade,  Fawcett appeared on multi-episode arcs on both "Spin City" and "The Guardian" and earned her third Emmy nod for her acclaimed turn on the latter in 2003. She lost that race to Emmy darling Alfre Woodard, who played a defendant on "The Practice."

Below, Fawcett and her two "Charlie's Angels" co-stars -- Kate Jackson and Jaclyn Smith -- pay tribute to the show's producer, the late Aaron Spelling, at the 2006 Emmy Awards.

Photo: ABC

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