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Category: Leonardo DiCaprio

Gold Derby nuggets: 'Shutter Island' reopens | '127 Hours' news and views | Casting news for 'The Hobbit'

October 22, 2010 | 11:29 am

Pete Hammond delivers the scoop on a "high profile kick-off to Paramount's 'Shutter Island' Oscar campaign." As Pete reports, "American Cinematheque will present a retrospective of the film collaborations of Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese at Hollywood's Egyptian Theatre the weekend of November 13 with the pair participating in a live 'conversation' following a November 14 screening. DiCaprio will appear in person while Scorsese will be satellited in from London where he is currently working on his new film 'Hugo Cabret.'" DEADLINE

• In the latest installment of their weekly Oscar Talk podcast, Anne Thompson and Kris Tapley dish about the odds of films like "Solitary Man" and "Welcome to the Rileys" making it into the race. THOMPSON ON HOLLYWOOD

127 HoursGraydon Carter moderates a compelling Q&A with "127 Hours" director Danny Boyle and star James Franco and the real-life subject of the film Aron Ralston, who was forced to cut off his own arm when he was trapped by a boulder while hiking alone. LITTLE GOLD MEN

Sasha Stone admits, "I don’t think I’ve ever spent a more riveting or emotionally moving hour and a half in the theater as I did last night watching '127 Hours.' It confirms what I already knew about Danny Boyle: that he is a genius visually, intellectually, emotionally. He knows that it isn’t just the story of how Ralston got out of that canyon; it’s that key bit of truth we all must remind ourselves of everyday: life is not lived alone. We need each other. We need to be able to ask for help." AWARDS DAILY

• The American Society of Cinematographers has named three more honorees who will be feted alongside Roger Deakins at the 25th-anniversary edition of their kudos on Feb. 13. John Seale will receive the International Award, Michael D. O’Shea is to get the Career Achievement in Television Award, and photographer Douglas Kirkland will take home the Presidents Award. ASC

• Casting has come together for Peter Jackson's two-part film adaptation of "The Hobbit." As Harley W. Lond reports, "Martin Freeman will star as Bilbo Baggins and Richard Armitage will play head dwarf Thorin Oakenshield. Other cast members — all of them to play dwarves — include Rob Kazinsky, Aidan Turner, Graham McTavish, John Callen, Stephen Hunter, Mark Hadlow and Peter Hambleton." MOVIEFONE

• "Toy Story 3" director Lee Unkrich and screenwriter Michael Arndt sit down with Terry Gross for a fascinating conversation about the making of this best picture contender as well as the history of the franchise. NPR

• The British Library has acquired more than 50 awards bestowed on the late Harold Pinter, including his 2005 Nobel Prize in literature. As Zainab Rahim reports, "The library acquired the awards through the government’s Acceptance in Lieu scheme, which seeks to ensure that important cultural treasures pass into the UK’s public collections. The BL, which is also a charity that advocates for the preservation of knowledge, previously acquired the playwright’s archive in December 2007 including his handwritten notes, typed drafts covered in annotations and his Nobel Prize acceptance speech that he was unable to deliver due to ill health " THE STAGE

Photo: Danny Boyle, left, and James Franco on the set of  "127 Hours." Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures.

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Poll: Will 'Inception' be nominated for best picture at the Oscars?

July 16, 2010 |  6:19 pm

On opening day, "Inception" is already proving to be a hit with moviegoers and film critics. Are Oscar voters next?

Inception Leonardo DiCaprio movie news

"Inception" director Christopher Nolan got a mixed reception from academy members with "The Dark Knight" two derbies ago. It was nominated for eight Oscars and won two — including best supporting actor for Heath Ledger — but it failed to make the list for best picture. Outrage over that snub was one of the reasons the academy chose to expand the number of best picture nominees to 10.

"Inception" scores 76 at Metacritic. The L.A. Times hails the film: "A tremendously exciting science-fiction thriller that's as disturbing as it sounds. This is a popular entertainment with a knockout punch so intense and unnerving it'll have you worrying if it's safe to close your eyes at night."

USA Today likes "Inception" too but doesn't gush so much: "The film is easier to admire than to fully grasp or be moved by it. Still, it's worth surrendering to the dream."

The New York Times merely shrugs it off: "Though there is a lot to see in 'Inception,' there is nothing that counts as genuine vision. Mr. Nolan’s idea of the mind is too literal, too logical, too rule-bound to allow the full measure of madness — the risk of real confusion, of delirium, of ineffable ambiguity — that this subject requires."

Photo: Warner Bros.

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'Inception' ignites Oscars debate among bloggers

July 6, 2010 | 11:39 am

Inception Leonardo DiCaprio Christopher Nolan Academy Awards Oscars poster "Inception" does not open for 10 days, but this latest film from writer-director Christopher Nolan ("The Dark Knight") has already set off a spirited debate in the blogosphere about its potential at the Oscars. The bloggers all judge "Inception" to be an outstanding sci-fi action thriller. However, there is divided opinion as to whether "Inception" is a lock to contend for the top Academy Awards.

Steve Pond of the Wrap says the movie "will no doubt have some naysayers; it won't follow 'Toy Story 3' in flirting with a 100% Rotten Tomatoes rating. (Of the handful of people I know who've seen it, most loved it, but one really, really hated it.) And it might be too much of a sci-fi, special-effects-genre picture to win over the more conservative elements of the Academy come Oscar time. But remember: If the Academy's move to 10 best picture nominations can be laid at the feet of any one film, that film was Nolan's last one, 'The Dark Knight.' It’s hard to imagine that voters won’t find this one thrilling enough to put it in the 10, and in quite a few other categories as well."

For Greg Ellwood of HitFix, the film "should benefit from strong reviews and is clearly a player in a number of categories this Oscar season. However, 'Inception' won't be for everyone. As noted, the picture requires the viewer to pay close attention to events even as they are clearly spelled out in front of them. Not all audiences will be prepared to have to 'think' during their summer movie season, but those that go for the ride will find an incredibly stimulating reward hit them before the credits roll."

Anne Thompson of Thompson on Hollywood believes "this eye-popping film will wow moviegoers all over the world -- its complexities will only encourage debate and repeat viewings -- and should also score well with critics and year-end awards groups. Oscar nominations in technical categories are a certainty, but 'Inception' is also a strong contender for multiple nominations, including best picture."

Continue reading »

Which actor is most overdue to win an Oscar?

March 8, 2009 |  9:24 am

Now that Kate Winslet is no longer poor Kate Winslet, five-time loser of the Academy Award, it's time to decide who deserves our pity next.

Nathaniel Rogers got this new pity party started over at Film Experience, combining male and female performers and deciding that we should all be boo-hoo-hoo-ing over Michelle Pfeiffer. Not a bad choice. She's lost three times and may be nominated next year for "Chéri," director Stephen Frears' adaptation of the romance novel penned by Colette. But there are so many snubbed stars in the Hollywood firmament, frankly, we'd like to break up this Oscars discussion into two parts based upon gender.

Let's start with the guys and have you pick the star you think we should all be rooting for.

Johnny_depp_brad_pitt_public_enemie

Of course, Peter O'Toole is most overdue in the literal sense, being the Oscars' biggest loser (eight defeats). But at this point, let's be honest, his hopes look dim. Besides, he's already got an honorary Oscar.

Poor Albert Finney doesn't have one of those and he's lost five times in the competitive races, but, truth be told, he also looks like a lost cause. He should have been nominated for "Big Fish" in 2003 but was snubbed. That tells us something, probably that the Oscar  voters don't appreciate how often he snubs them back, usually not bothering to attend the ceremony when he gets into the race. That started with his first big nom as best actor in 1963. The night "Tom Jones" won best picture at the Oscars, its star preferred to be in Hawaii partying with some foxy gals, so press reports tattled.

There are many others too, but our poll can only accommodate 10 names, so I had to be selective. Obvious choices are highly regarded, red-hot actors such as Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt. Johnny Depp could be back in the running soon with Michael Mann's "Public Enemies," Brad Pitt with Quentin Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds" and Leo DiCaprio with Martin Scorsese's "Shutter Island."

Stars like Donald Sutherland aren't here because they've never been nominated. Some chaps like Bill Murray and Edward Norton aren't listed because, well, they have PR problems within the industry and winning would be difficult for them, though not impossible. Others, including Liam Neeson and Dennis Hopper, aren't here because of my whim, but they were carefully considered. Really! Feel free to vote for whomever you like by clicking on the "Comments" link below. And please join in the heated discussion on this topic on our message boards.

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Photos: the Weinstein Co., Universal

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Will Brad Pitt lose best actor due to Oscars' Slap the Stud Syndrome?

February 18, 2009 |  3:36 pm

Brad_pitt_curious_case_of_benjamin_

What's really curious about "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" is that most Oscar pundits give the lead star of the film with the most nominations virtually no hope of winning best actor. Among the five contenders in that category, Brad Pitt is usually ranked fourth or fifth by prognosticators. Why?

Most likely it's punishment for his good looks. Look at other top male stars who haven't won Oscars despite working in Hollywood for years: Tom Cruise, Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Richard Gere. They're all heartthrobs — just like previous matinee stars who got snubbed in years past: James Dean, Steve McQueen, Tyrone Power and Robert Taylor.

Now consider the parade of young lovelies who dominated the actress awards in recent years. Best-actress champs over the last decade, for example, include Julia Roberts, Halle Berry, Nicole Kidman, Charlize Theron and Reese Witherspoon. Read more about that phenomenon in Gold Derby's separate blog piece about the Babe Factor.

Studs

The male counterpart to that female factor is the Slap the Stud Syndrome. While a few handsome male stars have managed to win now and then in the past, most have been denied. There's a clear pattern of it.

Consider the case of Tom Cruise, who lost the 1989 best actor Oscar to Daniel Day-Lewis. Both men played wheelchair-bound real-life heroes in "Born on the Fourth of July" and "My Left Foot," respectively. Cruise had won the Golden Globe while Day-Lewis had taken most of the critics prizes. When the British born Day-Lewis prevailed over the all-American Cruise many Oscarologists attributed this to another instance of the Slap the Stud Syndrome.

The theory goes that many of the academy voters are geezer guys who love the younger fillies but resent the handsome bucks. Their message to these Hollywood heartthrobs: "You already have it all –- fame, fortune and females aplenty. So, sorry pal, no Oscar for you, just yet."

However, just like the pretty women who de-glamorize themselves (Charlize Theron, "Monster"; Nicole Kidman, "The Hours") to win an Oscar so too can the handsome hunks who pack on a few pounds, a la George Clooney in 2005's "Syriana." Last year, Javier Bardem was the hunk du jour whose unflattering Buster Brown bowl cut in "No Country for Old Men" won him the supporting actor Oscar.

Studs3

And speaking of Clooney, as he was back to his usual movie-star-handsome-self last year in "Michael Clayton," the Slap the Stud Syndrome helped put Day-Lewis back in the winner's circle for "There Will Be Blood." That win also came at the expense of two-time loser Johnny Depp. He and Pitt, both 45, should take comfort in the fact that other studs won a best-actor Oscar later in their career when they were less of a threat to get the babes that the older academy guys can't.

While Tom Cruise lost his 1996 best actor bid for "Jerry Maguire" to respected stage star Geoffrey Rush ("Shine"), he lost the 1999 supporting actor race when nomm'd for "Magnolia" to one-time stud Michael Caine ("The Cider House Rules"). Caine did not win his first three best actor races and only won his first supporting Oscar ("Hannah and Her Sisters," 1986) when he was on other side of 50.

Continue reading »

Oscar nominations follow guild awards as a guide

January 22, 2009 | 11:59 am

This year 18 of the 19 SAG acting nominees are repeating at the Oscars. Since double SAG nominee Kate Winslet was bumped up by the Oscars from supporting to lead for "The Reader," she was denied a lead nom for "Revolutionary Road." However, that film's Michael Shannon managed to knock SAG nominee Dev Patel of "Slumdog Millionaire" out of the supporting race.

Last year 15 of the 20 SAG nominees went on to compete at the Oscars. Two years ago, it was a staggering 19 of the 20 with the one variation coming from the same film — "The Departed" — as SAG nominee Leonardo DiCaprio was replaced at Oscar time by Mark Wahlberg.

Oscars_nominations_guild_awards_4

Four of this year's five SAG-nominated ensembles appear in Oscar-nominated best pictures with SAG contender "Doubt" replaced by "The Reader." Last year only one SAG ensemble nominee — "No Country for Old Men" — made it into the best-picture race, although that film won both awards. Two years ago it was three of five, with "Little Miss Sunshine" taking the SAG prize, but losing the top Oscar to "The Departed."

All five of the lead actress nominees are competing for both awards, though Kate Winslet contends at the Oscars for "The Reader" rather than "Revolutionary Road." Last year, it was four of five as the only SAG nominee not needing a babysitter come Oscar night was Angelina Jolie ("A Mighty Heart") whose spot went to "The Savages" star Laura Linney.

The supporting actress race matches up four to five as the promotion of Kate Winslet for "The Reader" left room at the Oscars for the addition of Marisa Tomei ("The Wrestler"). Last year, this race was also four for five with SAG nominee Catherine Keener ("Into the Wild") replaced by Saoirse Ronan of "Atonement."

Lead actor matched up perfectly. Last year, it went three for five with SAG nominees and relative newcomers Emile Hirsch ("Into the Wild") and Ryan Gosling ("Lars and the Real Girl") replaced by Hollywood vets Johnny Depp ("Sweeney Todd") and Tommy Lee Jones ("In the Valley of Elah").

And, as mentioned, the supporting race is four for five with Shannon replacing Patel. Last year SAG nominee Tommy Lee Jones ("No Country") was replaced by Philip Seymour Hoffman ("Charlie Wilson's War").

The DGA picks for best director matched up with four of the five academy choices as DGA nominee Christopher Nolan ("The Dark Knight") was edged out at the Oscars by Stephen Daldry ("The Reader"). Daldry has only helmed three films and has Oscar nods for all of them, the previous two being "Billy Elliot" (2000) and "The Hours" (2002). Last year, DGA nominee Sean Penn ("Into the Wild") lost his Oscar slot to Jason Reitman who helmed best pic nominee "Juno."

The PGA nominees for best picture also went four for five with the Oscar contenders as "The Dark Knight" was bumped by "The Reader." Last year, it was also four for five with PGA nominee "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" replaced by "Atonement."

The WGA nods for original screenplay were shut out save for Dustin Lance Black and his script for "Milk." Last year they lined up with the Oscar nominees except for "Knocked Up" which was knocked out of the competition by the team who whipped up "Ratatouille." However, the adapted screenplay race went four for five with only the WGA nominees for "The Dark Knight" bumped by David Hare, who adapted "The Reader." Last year Sean Penn, who wowed the WGA with his adaptation of "Into the Wild," was snubbed by the Oscars as was the scripter for "Zodiac." They were replaced by "Atonement" adapter Christopher Hampton and first time writer-director Sarah Polley.

The ASC choices for best cinematography lined up with the Oscar nominees except for "Revolutionary Road" shooter Roger Deakins, who was replaced by Tom Stern for "Changeling." Last year the ASC went five for five.

The ACE picks for best editing match those of the Oscars. Last year ACE nominee "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" was replaced by "Michael Clayton."

Continue reading »

Oscars snub 'The Dark Knight' and star of 'Slumdog Millionaire'

January 22, 2009 |  8:38 am

"The Reader" has so much strength with voters at the Oscars that not only did it bump "The Dark Knight" from the top races for best picture and director, but Kate Winslet also was moved up from supporting to lead. Despite giving the core performance in the picture, Kate Winslet had been campaigning for a supporting nod so as not to cancel out her hopes for a lead nomination for "Revolutionary Road." The latter film, which was virtually snubbed, reunited Winslet with her "Titanic" costar Leonardo DiCaprio and was directed by her Oscar-winning husband, Sam Mendes ("American Beauty").

"Revolutionary Road" costars DiCaprio and Winslet were nominated for best lead drama actor and actress at the Golden Globes, where Winslet won twice: in lead for "Road" and supporting for "The Reader." However, DiCaprio was also snubbed today at the Oscars, just like he was the last time he costarred with Winslet — in "Titanic," which earned her a nomination for best actress (she lost to Helen Hunt, "As Good As It Gets"). "Titanic" ended up sailing off with more Oscars than any other movie in history (except "Ben-Hur," which also received 11), leaving its lead male star behind. DiCaprio, in turn, snubbed the Oscars and didn't attend the ceremony.

The_dark_knight_oscar_nominations_s

Over the last decade, the best picture and director lineups have been out of sync by at least one nomination in every year but 2005. So it was widely thought that if "The Dark Knight" didn't get in for best picture at least DGA nominee Christopher Nolan would be recognized for his helming. Instead, "The Reader's" Stephen Daldry made the cut with the directors, which lined up exactly with best picture. This means that Daldry has been nominated for every feature film he's ever directed. His previous two flicks were "Billy Elliot" (2000) and "The Hours" (2002).

The Oscar nominations for "The Reader" are a huge vindication for studio chief Harvey Weinstein, who forced the film's release in 2008 even though it meant clashing with co-producer Scott Rudin. Rudin was backing his other pony in the Oscar race — "Revolutionary Road." And with Kate Winslet understandably loyal to her husband, Rudin wanted Weinstein to wait till 2009 to release "The Reader." When Weinstein wouldn't, Rudin pulled his own name from the credits of "The Reader." Last year, Rudin produced best-picture winner "No Country for Old Men" and nominee "There Will Be Blood."

Many Oscarologists believed that Clint Eastwood ("Gran Torino") would be nominated for best actor despite the fact that he had been shut out at both the Golden Globes and SAG Awards. After all, Eastwood has never been nominated for acting by the Globes and wasn't nominated by SAG for "Million Dollar Baby." (SAG didn't have competitive awards when "Unforgiven" was released in 1992.) Nonetheless, he did manage to reap past acting bids at the Oscars for "Unforgiven" and "Million Dollar Baby."

It's surprising that critics' darling Sally Hawkins ("Happy-Go-Lucky") was snubbed, considering her early derby victories as best actress at both the Gotham and L.A. critics' awards, as well as the Golden Globes. Oscar voters nominated the lead female stars of other Mike Leigh films: Brenda Blethyn ("Secrets and Lies") and Imelda Staunton ("Vera Drake").

Where's the slumdog, you ask? Dev Patel, star of "Slumdog Millionaire" and a BAFTA lead actor nominee, was snubbed in the supporting race even though his film reaped an impressive tally of 10 nominations and is considered the front-runner to win best picture.

Indeed, the love for "Slumdog Millionaire" was so strong that the academy's music branch nominated two of the songs from the film — "Jai Ho" and "O Saya" — and snubbed past Oscar winner Bruce Springsteen, who just won a Golden Globe for the title track to "The Wrestler." Bruce Springsteen won his Oscar in 1993 for the song "Streets of Philadelphia" from the film "Philadelphia." He was nominated two years later for the title song of "Dead Man Walking" but lost to "Colors of the Wind" from "Pocahontas."

NOTABLE OSCARS SNUBS

BEST PICTURE
"The Dark Knight"
"Wall-E"
"Gran Torino"

BEST DIRECTOR
Christopher Nolan, "The Dark Knight"

BEST ACTOR
Clint Eastwood ("Gran Torino")
Leonardo DiCaprio ("Revolutionary Road")
Dustin Hoffman ("Last Chance Harvey")

BEST ACTRESS
Sally Hawkins ("Happy-Go-Lucky")
Cate Blanchett ("The Curious Case of Benjamin Button")
Kristin Scott Thomas ("I've Loved You So Long")

Continue reading »

Oscars best-actor slugfest: Dave Karger backs that 'Wrestler' guy, I take the 'Milk' dude

December 20, 2008 | 11:50 am

Following up on our video matchup over the Oscars' best-picture race, Dave Karger of Entertainment Weekly and I come out swinging over who'll triumph as best actor.

Camera work by Paul Sheehan


Experts' Oscars predix: 'Slumdog Millionaire' and Meryl Streep out front

December 19, 2008 |  9:56 am

Oscars_predix_slumdog_millionaire_2

The Envelope's Buzzmeter has constantly updated Oscars predictions from experts, but I like to spotlight a few now and then to see how they compare. This random sampling of five views shows "Slumdog Millionaire" ahead for best picture by a score of 3 out of 5 votes. Meryl Streep ("Doubt") has the same edge in the best actress race, but there's no clear fave for best actor. Frank Langella ("Frost/Nixon") and Sean Penn ("Milk") have two votes each.

Our featured pundits: Patrick Kevin Day (The Envelope, L.A. Times), Scott Feinberg (Feinberg Files, The Envelope), Peter Howell (Toronto Star), Bob Tourtellotte (Reuters), Susan Wloszczyna (USA Today). Rankings are listed numerically from first choice (1) to last choice (5).

BEST PICTURE Day Feinberg Howell Tourtellotte Wloszczyna
'Benjamin Button'

4

2

1

2

2

'Dark Knight'

2

 

3

 

5

'Doubt'      

4

 

'Frost/Nixon'

5

3

5

1

4

'Milk'

3

4

   

3

'Revolutionary Road'  

5

4

5

 
'Slumdog Millionaire'

1

1

2

3

1


BEST ACTOR Day Feinberg Howell Tourtellotte Wloszczyna
Leo DiCaprio, 'Revolutionary Road  

 

5

4

 

Clint Eastwood, 'Gran Torino'

5

 

 

 

 

Richard Jenkins,

'The Visitor'

3

5

 

 

5

Frank Langella, 'Frost/Nixon'

1

3

1

2

3

Sean Penn, 'Milk'

2

1

2

3

1

Brad Pitt, 'Benjamin Button'

 

4

3

5

4

Mickey Rourke, 'The Wrestler'

4

2

4

1

2

BEST ACTRESS Day Feinberg Howell Tourtellotte Wloszczyna
Anne Hathaway, 'Rachel Getting Married'

2

3

3

5

4

Cate Blanchett,

'Benjamin Button'

 

 

 

1

 
Angelina Jolie, 'Changeling'

3

 

5

4

5

Sally Hawkins,

'Happy-Go-Lucky'

1

       

Melissa Leo,

'Frozen River'

 

5

 

 

 
Meryl Streep, 'Doubt'

 

1

1

3

1

Kristin Scott Thomas, 'I've Loved You So Long'

4

4

4

 

2

Kate Winslet, 'Revolutionary Road'

 

2

2

2

3

Kate Winslet,

'The Reader'

5

       

Left photo: Meryl Streep in "Doubt." Credit: Miramax

Right photo: Dev Patel in "Slumdog Millionaire." Credit: Fox Searchlight


Inside Dave Karger's Oscars crystal ball: A fascinating combine-the-lists theory

December 17, 2008 |  8:14 am

EW's Dave Karger points to some fascinating Oscars tea leaves: "The top 10 lists from the AFI, National Board of Review, and Broadcast Film Critics Association combined [are] the most reliable bellwether of eventual Academy success." He cites examples from recent years that nail many Oscar best-picture nominees, then applies the formula to this year's lists and comes up with one too many films.

The six flicks for the five nominee slots: "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," "Milk," "Frost/Nixon," "The Dark Knight," "Wall-E," "The Wrestler." Doubt_revolutionary_road1 That means "Slumdog Millionaire" won't be nominated — that's ridiculous — but it couldn't appear on the AFI list because it's a foreign production. Yes, "Button," "Milk" and "Frost/Nixon" seem to be shoo-ins. "Wall-E" and "The Wrestler" are real loooooong shots, though. In fact, I don't think "The Wrestler" has any shot at all.

Karger's blog post thus suggests that "Doubt" and "Revolutionary Road" are in big trouble, but Oscar campaigner Cynthia Swartz, who reps both, fights back. She roars back at him: "Here is another piece of history that totally rebuts your history. In the past 50 years, 60 films have received at least 3 acting nominations. 52 of them were nominated for best picture. Of the 8 that were not, only 4 also had a screenplay nomination. And since there are no actors in the NBR, the BFCA or on the AFI board, I will go with my history."

While I agree that there are a few (slight) cracks in Dave's combine-the-lists theory, I think there are giant canyons in Cynthia's view. She's assuming that "Doubt" will have three acting noms and probably a screenplay bid. Noms for Meryl Streep and screenplay seem locked up for "Doubt," but there's real doubt that Philip Seymour Hoffman, Viola Davis and/or Amy Adams will get in too.

Cynthia's probably banking on Leo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet and Michael Shannon garnering bids for "Revolutionary Road." I'd be surprised to see that much love in the academy's acting branch for two movies left off of the AFI list of top 10 films of 2008. Further signs of trouble: "Revolutionary Road" got nommed for best drama picture by the Golden Globes, but was left off of the Critics' Choice list of 10 contenders for best pic. "Doubt" was snubbed by Globers in the top slot, but made the Critics' Choice rundown.

Photos: Meryl Streep in "Doubt." Credit: Miramax; Leonardo DiCaprio in "Revolutionary Road." Credit: Paramount Vantage


Golden Globe nominations: Pundits' reax and predix scores too!

December 11, 2008 | 10:35 pm

• While comparing the Golden Globe nominations with the Critics' Choice bids announced a few days ago, Pete Hammond sees a curious parallel between "Milk" getting skunked at the Golden Globes and what happened last year to "Into the Wild."

Pete_and_tom1

• Check out the pundit videos Pete and I did riffing with Elizabeth Snead immediately after the noms were announced. They're down on the right side of The Envelope's home page.

Scott Feinberg does a fine job at Feinberg Files putting perspective on the Golden Globe nominations, but I disagree with him about "In Bruges" pulling off big surprises in the comedy/musical races. I predicted that it would.

• By the way, speaking of predix, here's how various pundits scored trying to out-guess the Globes. Just counting the same categories we all guessed in tandem, I scored 23, Scott nailed 20. Nathaniel Rogers scored 21 at TheFilmExperience. Guy Lodge beat us all at InContention.com (24). Congrats, Guy! For the complete list of nominees, CLICK HERE!

• Over at InContention.com Kris Tapley and Guy Lodge clash while sizing up Tom Cruise's nomination for "Tropic Thunder." Guy calls it "goofy," Kris calls it one of the best Globe calls.

Sasha Stone likes the nominations of Brad Pitt, Leo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet at AwardsDaily.com.

Gold_derby_dates_sked1

• New York Times Carpetbagger David Carr believes in the Harvey Weinstein conspiracy to explain how "The Reader" got so many noms. No, no, David — not this time anyway. Believe it or not, voters really like the movie. I've heard that directly from many HFPA members. EW's Dave Karger heard the same buzz.

• Over at Hollywood-Elsewhere.com, Jeff Wells wonders about such Harvey conspiracy thoughts, but acknowledges that "many critics and smartypants-types" were probably too quick to dismiss the kudos chances of "The Reader" earlier.

• Uh, oh! That Hollywood Reporter wag, Gold Rusher T.L. Stanley, is risking her neck with some bold (?) prophecies: "There are a number of foregone conclusions in the nods today, namely, 'Gomorra' in the best foreign language category, Heath Ledger as best supporting actor for 'The Dark Knight' and Penelope Cruz for best supporting actress in 'Vicky Cristina Barcelona.' "

• At Variety.com, Anne Thompson writes, "Athough the Globes saw fit to only recognize Sean Penn's performance in Gus Van Sant's very American and very political Milk (which won best film from the New York Film Critics Circle), that should not hurt its overall awards chances."

• Hang tough, Lou! New York Post's Lou Lumenick acknowledges that he "received some criticism on other blogs for supposedly revealing 'spoilers' in our year-end wrap-up" at the NYFCC voting, but, come on, other journos before Lou did the same for decades in Gotham's newspaper pages dating back to the group's launch in 1935. Plowing through those ancient reports on microfilm for many days and weeks at the New York Public Library was how I was able to document past scores and voter battles while compiling my book "Movie Awards." In recent years that tattle's lapsed a bit and I've had to resort to snooping via telephone calls to various members for such reports here at Gold Derby, but I'm happy that this ballot reportage is now back out in the open, as it should be. Huzzahs to Lou!


Critics' Choice Awards toast 'Milk' and 'Benjamin Button,' snub 'Revolutionary Road'

December 9, 2008 |  7:44 am

"Milk" and "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" lead with the most Critics' Choice Award nominations at eight apiece while "The Dark Knight," "Doubt," and "Slumdog Millionaire" have six each. All five are among the 10  films competing for best picture.

The Broadcast Film Critics Association's voters took a sharp detour from "Revolutionary Road," which was completely snubbed. No nod for picture, director (Sam Mendes), actor (Leonardo DiCaprio), supporting actor (Michael Shannon), adapted screenplay and — most surprisingly of all — actress (Kate Winslet).

Critics_choice1

Perhaps its snub for best picture isn't surprising considering that all 10 nominees for that top prize scored higher in the numerical tallies that sum up the voters' opinions at the Broadcast Film Critics Association's website ("Changeling" barely edging it, 79 to 78 — "Revolutionary Road," meantime, has a perfect 100 score from the print and Internet critics at RottenTomatoes.com), but the Critics' Choice Award likes to pride itself as an Oscar crystal ball. Many Oscarologists consider Winslet a front-runner to win best actress at the Kodak Theater next February. Could this be one of those cases like Halle Berry ("Monster's Ball") or Denzel Washington ("Training Day") where Critics' Choice misses the Oscar mark so much that it fails even to nominate the eventual winner? Or does this snub spell gloom for Winslet's Oscar hopes in that race? She is nominated today in the supporting category for "The Reader."

Below is a partial list of nominees. See more at the Critics' Choice website HERE.

BEST PICTURE
"Changeling"
"The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"
"The Dark Knight"
"Doubt"
"Frost/Nixon"
"Milk"
"The Reader"
"Slumdog Millionaire"
"Wall-E"
"The Wrestler"

BEST ACTOR
Clint Eastwood, "Gran Torino"
Richard Jenkins, "The Visitor"
Frank Langella, "Frost/Nixon"
Sean Penn, "Milk"
Brad Pitt, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"
Mickey Rourke, "The Wrestler"

BEST ACTRESS
Kate Beckinsale, "Nothing But the Truth"
Cate Blanchett, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"
Anne Hathaway, "Rachel Getting Married"
Angelina Jolie, "Changeling"
Melissa Leo, "Frozen River"
Meryl Streep, "Doubt"

Photos: Focus Features, Paramount, Paramount Vantage


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