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Category: Peter Jackson

Gold Derby nuggets: 'Animal Kingdom' dominates Aussie 'Oscars' noms | 'The Hobbit' staying in New Zealand | 'The King's Speech' to Broadway?

October 27, 2010 | 10:41 am

Animal Kingdom poster • As Michael Bodey reports, "Crime drama 'Animal Kingdom' has swamped the Australian Film Institute nominations, grabbing a nod in every category for which it was eligible. The film about a Melbourne crime family overseen by a charismatic matriarch (played by Jacki Weaver) earned 18 nominations, with war drama 'Beneath Hill 60' next in numbers with a surprising 12 nominations. Jane Campion's British-Australian co-production 'Bright Star' earned 11 nominations, the teen novel adaptation 'Tomorrow When The War Began' earned eight and indigenous musical 'Bran Nue Dae' and the French-Australian co-production 'The Tree' grabbed seven nominations each. All six films will vie for the best film prize." THE AUSTRALIAN

Mike Fleming has the scoop: "Attorneys representing the Gotham-based real estate clan The Durst Organization are threatening to sue over the December release of 'All Good Things.'" The pic stars Ryan Gosling as a character allegedly modeled on Robert Durst, who was accused of murdering his wife and friend. DEADLINE

Kyle Buchanan considers whether or not Sandra Bullock will be able to avoid the curse that has befallen other best actress champs as of late. As he notes: "If all goes according to plan, Bullock's next three films will be 'Gravity,' an ambitious space drama directed by Alfonso Cuarón ('Children of Men'), an adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer's acclaimed novel 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close' by Stephen Daldry ('The Hours'), and an untitled comedy that would find Bullock co-starring opposite A-listers like Meryl Streep and Oprah Winfrey." VULTURE

The HobbitRichard Verrier has all the details on the decision to keep production of the prequels to Peter Jackson's Oscar-winning trilogy "The Lord of the Rings" in New Zealand: "The nation's prime minister, John Key, announced Wednesday that his government had reached an agreement with the producers of the two 'Hobbit' movies to keep the $500-million production in his country. 'I am delighted we have achieved this result,' Key said in a statement. 'Making the two 'Hobbit' movies here will not only safeguard work for thousands of New Zealanders, but it will also follow the success of the 'Lord of the Rings' trilogy in once again promoting New Zealand on the world stage.' The agreement comes after Key held talks with New Line Cinema President Toby Emmerich and other executives, who wanted assurances that the production would not be disrupted by labor unrest. They also were seeking additional financial sweeteners, which they received." COMPANY TOWN

Jeff Wells examines the awards prospects for "I Am Love" leading lady Tilda Swinton. HOLLYWOOD ELSEWHERE

Guy Lodge sings the praises of Emma Stone for her sparkling performance in the teen comedy "Easy A," and bemoans the lack of love from the academy for funny turns by pretty young things. IN CONTENTION

• The 2008 Tony best musical champ, "In the Heights," is closing Jan. 9. Creator and star Lin-Manuel Miranda, who won a Tony for his score, will be returning to the show for the final two weeks. PLAYBILL

The Kings Speech • As Patrick Healey notes: "If the highly anticipated Colin Firth film 'The King's Speech' performs well this awards season, chances are a stage version will come about relatively quickly on Broadway, in London's West End, or both. Michael Alden, a producer on the Broadway musical 'Grey Gardens' and the Sarah Jones solo show 'Bridge & Tunnel,' said in an interview on Tuesday that he was developing a stage production of 'The King’s Speech' after acquiring the rights to the work, about the real-life relationship between King George VI of Britain (the World War II monarch and current queen’s father) and a speech therapist named Lionel Logue, who helped him overcome a stammer." ARTS BEAT

• Reports Joyce Eng: "Justin Bieber, Ke$ha and Katy Perry will make their American Music Awards debuts next month as performers, producers announced Wednesday. All three are multiple nominees and will duke it out in the artist of the year race alongside Lady Gaga and Eminem. Bieber is up for four awards, while Ke$ha and Perry each have three nominations. Eminem and Lady Antebellum lead with five bids." TV GUIDE

Upper photo: "Animal Kingdom" poster. Credit: Sony Pictures Classics

Middle photo: "The Hobbit" book cover. Credit: Houghton Mifflin

Lower photo: Geoffrey Rush, Colin Firth and Helena Bonham Carter in "The King's Speech." Credit: The Weinstein Co.

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Gold Derby nuggets: 'Shutter Island' reopens | '127 Hours' news and views | Casting news for 'The Hobbit'

October 22, 2010 | 11:29 am

Pete Hammond delivers the scoop on a "high profile kick-off to Paramount's 'Shutter Island' Oscar campaign." As Pete reports, "American Cinematheque will present a retrospective of the film collaborations of Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese at Hollywood's Egyptian Theatre the weekend of November 13 with the pair participating in a live 'conversation' following a November 14 screening. DiCaprio will appear in person while Scorsese will be satellited in from London where he is currently working on his new film 'Hugo Cabret.'" DEADLINE

• In the latest installment of their weekly Oscar Talk podcast, Anne Thompson and Kris Tapley dish about the odds of films like "Solitary Man" and "Welcome to the Rileys" making it into the race. THOMPSON ON HOLLYWOOD

127 HoursGraydon Carter moderates a compelling Q&A with "127 Hours" director Danny Boyle and star James Franco and the real-life subject of the film Aron Ralston, who was forced to cut off his own arm when he was trapped by a boulder while hiking alone. LITTLE GOLD MEN

Sasha Stone admits, "I don’t think I’ve ever spent a more riveting or emotionally moving hour and a half in the theater as I did last night watching '127 Hours.' It confirms what I already knew about Danny Boyle: that he is a genius visually, intellectually, emotionally. He knows that it isn’t just the story of how Ralston got out of that canyon; it’s that key bit of truth we all must remind ourselves of everyday: life is not lived alone. We need each other. We need to be able to ask for help." AWARDS DAILY

• The American Society of Cinematographers has named three more honorees who will be feted alongside Roger Deakins at the 25th-anniversary edition of their kudos on Feb. 13. John Seale will receive the International Award, Michael D. O’Shea is to get the Career Achievement in Television Award, and photographer Douglas Kirkland will take home the Presidents Award. ASC

• Casting has come together for Peter Jackson's two-part film adaptation of "The Hobbit." As Harley W. Lond reports, "Martin Freeman will star as Bilbo Baggins and Richard Armitage will play head dwarf Thorin Oakenshield. Other cast members — all of them to play dwarves — include Rob Kazinsky, Aidan Turner, Graham McTavish, John Callen, Stephen Hunter, Mark Hadlow and Peter Hambleton." MOVIEFONE

• "Toy Story 3" director Lee Unkrich and screenwriter Michael Arndt sit down with Terry Gross for a fascinating conversation about the making of this best picture contender as well as the history of the franchise. NPR

• The British Library has acquired more than 50 awards bestowed on the late Harold Pinter, including his 2005 Nobel Prize in literature. As Zainab Rahim reports, "The library acquired the awards through the government’s Acceptance in Lieu scheme, which seeks to ensure that important cultural treasures pass into the UK’s public collections. The BL, which is also a charity that advocates for the preservation of knowledge, previously acquired the playwright’s archive in December 2007 including his handwritten notes, typed drafts covered in annotations and his Nobel Prize acceptance speech that he was unable to deliver due to ill health " THE STAGE

Photo: Danny Boyle, left, and James Franco on the set of  "127 Hours." Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures.

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Gold Derby nuggets: Pete Hammond: Oscars in November | 'The Hobbit' sets starting date | Supporting race surprises

October 15, 2010 |  5:23 pm

• After reviewing the pros and cons of moving the Oscars, Pete Hammond proposes that they should indeed change the ceremony's timing. However, for Pete, such a shift should not be just the few weeks being bandied about as of late but months earlier -- in November. DEADLINE

Sasha Stone considers five films that could replicate the success of "The Blind Side" at this year's Oscars. Leading her list is "For Colored Girls" followed by "Love and Other Drugs" and "Secretariat." "How Do You Know" and "The Town" round out her selections for that slot. AWARDS DAILY

Kris Tapley and Anne Thompson welcome In Contention contributor Guy Lodge and Indie Wire blogger Peter Knegt to the latest installment of their weekly Oscar Talk podcast. IN CONTENTION

The Hobbit • "The Hobbit" is a go, says Sharon Waxman. Peter Jackson, who hauled home three Oscars for his work on the final film in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, is helming the two prequels with lensing on the first to start in February. As Sharon notes, "Jackson was already on board to write and produce 'The Hobbit.' But because of financial turmoil at MGM, which owns half of the franchise together with Warners' New Line Cinema, the project became one of the most torturous in Hollywood history. Sets have already been built in New Zealand, and actors -- including Sir Ian McKellan -- have been on hold for months; Martin Freeman has been rumored to play Bilbo Baggins." THE WRAP

• On Oct. 18 at 1 p.m. ET, former New York Times film critic Elvis Mitchell will host a live webcast to reveal the nominees for the 20th annual Gotham Independent Film Awards. The awards will be handed out on Nov. 29 at Cipriani Wall Street. In addition to the competitive kudos, actors Robert Duvall and Hilary Swank, director Darren Aronofsky and Focus Features’ CEO James Schamus will each be presented with a career tribute. GOTHAM AWARDS

• With two-time Oscar champ Hilary Swank's latest film, "Conviction," opening Friday, Kyle Buchanan and Claude Brodesser-Aknera analyze her award and career prospects. As they observe, "Unlike many actresses her age, the 36-year-old Swank is better suited for award-caliber dramas than romantic comedies, and while Hollywood is rough on women already, it's even less receptive to the idea of building a mid-priced drama around one." VULTURE

Nathaniel Rogers turns his attention to the supporting actor race. As he notes, "Lately, Oscar voters have been on a villainous bender in the Supporting Actor category. There are many reasons for this, the first being who the hell would deny Ledger in '07, Bardem in '08 and Waltz in '09? But aside from a great quality performance -- not usually the deciding factor -- Oscar has always enjoyed a good stock role, particularly in the Supporting categories. Are they in the mood for The Sidekick, The Villain, The Wisened Old Man/Mentor, The Sad Sack, or The Eccentric Weirdo?" THE FILM EXPERIENCE

Erik Childress makes the provocative suggestion that Annette Bening should consider dropping down to the supporting race for her performance in "The Kids Are All Right." MOVIEFONE

Image: "The Hobbit" book cover. Credit: Houghton Mifflin Co.

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Gold Derby nuggets: 'Social Network' star isn't fan of Facebook | 'The Hobbit' hobbled

September 27, 2010 |  3:58 pm

The Social Network posterJesse Eisenberg, star of "The Social Network," makes a startling confession to Anna David: "Look, I don't have a Facebook page because I have little interest in hearing myself talk about myself any further than I already do in interviews or putting any more about myself online than there already is. But if I wasn't in this position, I'm sure I would use it every day." And he admits he identified with Mark Zuckerberg: "I'm uncomfortable in the same way Mark is. I can't watch myself in interviews. I feel like I look like a wreck. My mom is always calling me and going, 'Stop fidgeting,' and it's like, 'You have no idea what it's like, Mom.'" THE DAILY BEAST

• For Aaron Sorkin, scribe of "The Social Network," the appeal of telling the tale of the founding of Facebook was the various versions. "If the same story was behind the invention of MySpace or Friendster, I would have written that. Two separate lawsuits were brought against Facebook at roughly the same time. Rather than pick one and decide that's the truth, or pick one and say that's the sexiest, I like the idea that there are three conflicting stories." OBSERVER

"Iron Cross," the final film starring two-time Oscar nominee Roy Scheider, was feted by the just-wrapped Boston film fest. Writer-director Joshua Newton received the Visionary Filmmaker award while his son Alexander Newton was awarded the best young actor prize. Scheider was saluted for a lifetime of achievement.

• To celebrate the 45th anniversary of 1965 Oscar champ "The Sound of Music," the cast is reuniting on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" on Oct. 29. Stars Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer will be joined by the seven actors who played the Von Trapp children in this classic musical.  AP

• The fifth season of "Dexter" debuted to the best numbers -- 2.3 million viewers -- for a Showtime series in 15 years.

The Hobbit • In a provocative piece, Kyle Buchanan wonders whether Peter Jackson should just give up on "The Hobbit." As he notes, "The attempt to prequelize the 'Lord of the Rings' saga famously lost director Guillermo del Toro in May after troubled MGM couldn't guarantee a green light, and since then, there's been one new problem after another. The two-film production is still without a director and a lead actor, series godfather Peter Jackson remains commitment-phobic about helming 'The Hobbit' himself, intended star Martin Freeman is committed to the BBC show 'Sherlock,' and now several actors guilds have told performers to refuse work on the non-union production." VULTURE

• Three-time Emmy champ Bryan Cranston ("Breaking Bad") sure has a fan in his one-time on-screen sparring partner Jane Kaczmarek. The pair played marrieds on "Malcolm in the Middle" for seven seasons. Jane says, "I loved working with him largely because I knew he had this spectacular ability. He always reminded me of Jack Lemmon. Think of 'Days of Wine and Roses' or 'The Apartment'; [Lemmon] was very funny, but he also was the real thing dramatically. And Bryan is those things, too." ZAP2IT

Phil Keoghan, host of "The Amazing Race," chatted to Louis Virtel in advance of Sunday's premiere episode of the seven-time Emmy champ. Says Phil, "The schedule that we have is so ridiculously brutal — it would be insane to describe to you how it is sometimes. I mean, imagine the most insane schedule you can and then multiply it. The thing that I’m so blessed with is that I get to go on this whirlwind trip around the world, and in 25 days, I see the most extraordinary things and meet the most extraordinary people." MOVIELINE

Top image: "The Social Network" poster. Credit: Columbia

Bottom image: "The Hobbit" book cover. Credit: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Gold Derby nuggets: 'The Hobbit' hobbled by helmer's exit | Homer Simpson tops with EW | 'Curb' appeal

June 1, 2010 |  1:11 pm

The Hobbit • The status of "The Hobbit," the long-in-the-making two-part prequel to the hit trilogy "The Lord of the Rings," just became much cloudier with the news that helmer Guillermo del Toro ("Pan's Labryinth") has walked. The first of the films -- produced by Peter Jackson, who picked up three Oscars for the final installment of "LOTR" -- was slated to arrive in theaters in December 2012 with the second out a year later. In a statement, Del Toro said, "In light of ongoing delays in the setting of a start date for filming 'The Hobbit,' I am faced with the hardest decision of my life. After nearly two years of living, breathing and designing a world as rich as [J.R.R.] Tolkien's Middle Earth, I must, with great regret, take leave from helming these wonderful pictures." The much-in-demand Del Toro has decided to move on but harbors no ill will to the project. "Both as a co-writer and as a director, I wish the production nothing but the very best of luck and I will be first in line to see the finished product. I remain an ally to it and its makers, present and future, and fully support a smooth transition to a new director." REUTERS

Elizabeth Guider reports that HBO did great business selling foreign rights to the upcoming first season of "Boardwalk Empire" at the just-concluded LA screenings. This is the paycaster's marquee series for 2010 and could be a major awards player based on the pedigree of the behind-the-scenes talent alone. Oscar champ Martin Scorsese ("The Departed") is executive producing the series about bootleggers in 1920s Atlantic City and directed the first episode. Terence Winter -- who adapted Nelson Johnson's novel of the same name -- won two Emmys for scripting episodes of "The Sopranos" and another two when that HBO hit won best drama series in 2004 and 2007. THR

• The first rialto revival of "Fences" continues to break Broadway box-office records. Yet again, it topped the $1-million mark last week. This remounting of the 1987 Tony and Pulitzer Prize winner by August Wilson is up for 10 Tony Awards and is a front-runner in the best play revival race. The two stars -- two-time Oscar champ Denzel Washington ("Glory," "Training Day") and Oscar nominee Viola Davis ("Doubt") -- are strong contenders in their categories too. "Fences" is also nominated for best featured actor (Stephen McKinley Henderson), score (Brandford Marsalis), scenic design, costumes, sound design and lighting.

The Simpsons Entertainment WeeklyHomer Simpson edged out Harry Potter to top the Entertainment Weekly roundup of the 100 most memorable characters of the last two decades. "Simpsons" creator Matt Groening told the magazine that people relate to the tubby hubby "because we're all secretly propelled by desires we can't admit to." "The Simpsons" has won 25 Emmys over its first two decades: 10 for top animated program under one hour, 13 for voice-over (including four for "Homer" himself, Dan Castellaneta) and two for top song. The title role of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" as played by the perpetually Emmy-snubbed Sarah Michelle Gellar came in third, and Tony Soprano ("The Sopranos") -- which won James Gandolfini three Emmys -- was fourth. Comic-book arch-villain the Joker -- so brilliantly reimagined by the late Heath Ledger in "The Dark Knight" -- was fifth. ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

• As Greg Ellwood observes, "Last year, four of the best picture nominees were released in the summer: 'Up,' 'Inglourious Basterds,' 'District 9" and 'The Hurt Locker.' The 83rd Academy Awards probably won't match that total, but there are more summer players than usual for awards season overall. Just previewing the feature films, there are eight releases that should easily make some noise over the next three months." For Greg, among those upcoming releases that could make the top 10 at the Oscars are "Inception" and "The Kids Are All Right." HIT FIX

Mike Ausiello chats with "House" leading man Hugh Laurie, who reveals he has no idea how long he will keep playing the curmudgeonly character that has netted him four Emmy nominations but no wins. Whether the upcoming Season 7 will be the last for Laurie remains a question mark. He told Mike, "I only hope we’ll know when the time is right [to close up shop]. When people blunder on for five years after [they should have called it quits] … it gets taken out of your hands. Someone will say, "That’s it." But for now, I’m immensely proud of the things we did this season." The show has lost the drama series race for the last four consecutive years. ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

564_curb_your_enthusiasm_468 • Reruns of "Curb Your Enthusiasm" debut on the TV Guide network Tuesday, and though the basic-cable caster will edit the show for nudity and language, it is not cutting it for length. "Curb" ran 30 minutes or so on commercial-free HBO, so to round out the hour time slot, the net is programming "Curb: The Discussion." Hosted by "Curb" star Susie Essman and co-produced by the show's creator and star Larry David, the first panelists will be David's old pal Jerry Seinfeld, Emmy nominee Jon Hamm ("Mad Men") and Oscar nominee Taraji Henson ("The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"). The five-time Emmy contender for comedy series drew its best ratings for Season 7, which used a reunion of "Seinfeld" as a plot device for creator and star Larry David to repair his TV marriage. As for the future, David says, "Usually when a season ends, especially a season as successful as last season, it takes a while to recharge and come up with enough ideas so you know that you'll have a funny season. So it took some time, but I think we've got some good stuff coming up for Season 8." TV GUIDE

• Jerry Seinfeld is trying his hand at directing this month, helming Colin Quinn's one-man show, "Long Story Short." This showcase for the former "SNL" star begins a summer run off-Broadway on June 18. While "Curb Your Enthusiasm" has had lousy luck at the Emmys, winning just one of its 30 bids (best director for Robert B. Weide for the "Krazee-Eyez Killa" episode in 2003), "Seinfeld" snagged 10 laurels out of its 70 nominations, including best comedy series of 1993. PLAYBILL

Top photo: "The Hobbit" book cover. Credit: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Middle photo: Entertainment Weekly cover. Credit: EW.

Bottom photo: "Curb Your Enthusiasm" logo. Credit: HBO

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Gold Derby nuggets: Bigelow more influential than Cameron | 'Chicago' creators allege accounting razzle dazzle | 'The Hobbit' arrives in 2012

April 29, 2010 |  2:01 pm

Kathryn Bigelow The Hurt Locker OscarsKathryn Bigelow has bested her ex James Cameron once again. The Oscar-winning director of "The Hurt Locker" secured the third spot on Time's top 25 most influential artists of the year -- only Lady Gaga and Conan O'Brien ranked higher -- while the onetime "king of the world" had to settle for the last slot despite creating the biggest moneymaker in movie history with "Avatar." Also earning places of distinction were director Neill Blokamp -- who contended at this year's Oscars for his script for best picture nominee "District 9" -- at No. 16 and best actress champ Sandra Bullock ("The Blind Side") at No. 22. Neil Patrick Harris -- who hosted both the Emmys and Tonys last year and opened this year's Oscars -- was ranked No. 10. TIME

• James Cameron may not cut it with Time magazine, but the folks at NASA listen to him. Emma Gallegos reports that the Oscar winner met with Charles Bolden, the head honcho of NASA, in January to persuade him to include a 3-D camera on Curiosity, a rover headed to Mars next year. PASADENA STAR NEWS

Cara Shultz considers Sandra Bullock's acceptance speeches at the Oscars and Golden Globes in light of the revelation Wednesday that she and her then-husband Jesse James had adopted a baby in January. Onstage at the Kodak Theater, Bullock said, "I would like to thank what this film is about for me -- the moms that take care of the babies and the children no matter where they come from. Those moms and parents never get thanked." And at the Globes in January, she said, "A family is not just who you were born to, or what color you are. It's who's got your back." PEOPLE

Chicago DVD • Composer John Kander and representatives of the late lyricist Fred Ebb and director-choreographer Bob Fosse -- who together brought "Chicago" to Broadway in 1975 -- are suing the producers of the 2002 Oscar-winning film adaptation. The lawsuit alleges that "the studios' 'financial theatrics' ... resulted in a nearly $200 million increase in the 'Adjusted Gross Receipts' from which plaintiffs' participation is calculated. With interest, the net impact on plaintiffs is the wrongful reduction of their share by upwards of $12 million." PLAYBILL

Kid Rock has confirmed he will host the ninth annual CMT Music Awards. In a three-sentence post on his website, Rock said, "The rumors are true – I’m hosting the CMT Awards live from Nashville on June 9th… All I can promise is I will be awesome." Last year the rocker won Wide Open Country video of the year for "All Summer Long." This year, eight of the nine categories at the CMTs have eight contenders apiece. Online voting that runs till Monday will winnow these to four finalists in each category, which will be announced May 11. Then another round of online voting through June 8 will determine the winners. Voting for video of the year is different. There are 10 semifinalists, which will be cut down to a final five that will be revealed at the start of the awards ceremony, and the winner of the top prize will be determined by votes cast online and via text message during the kudocast.

• The power of a Facebook petition helped land Betty White a hosting gig on "Saturday Night Live." Now, there is a movement afoot online to have "Glee" devote an episode to the music of Barbra Streisand, much as it did last week with Madonna. Writes Allison Walman, "What do you think it meant when co-creator Ryan Murphy accepted the Golden Globe for 'Glee' last January, he said, 'Thank you to the Hollywood Foreign Press and Miss Barbra Streisand.' That was a shout-out linking Streisand to that show. And don't forget that for sectionals, Rachel channeled Streisand when she sang 'Don't Rain on My Parade.' " TV SQUAD

The Hobbit • The status of "The Hobbit," the long-in-the-making two-part prequel to the hit trilogy "The Lord of the Rings," just became much clearer. The first of the films -- produced by Peter Jackson, who picked up three Oscars for the final installment of "LOTR" and directed by Guillermo del Toro ("Pan's Labryinth") -- will arrive in theaters in December 2012 and the second will be out a year later. As Borys Kit reports, "A confusion over release dates surfaced earlier today when Imax announced an overall, 20-film, three-year deal with Warners. In outlining which films would be included, Imax incorrectly gave 2013 as the release date for the first 'Hobbit' movie." HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Top photo: Kathryn Bigelow backstage at the 82nd annual Academy Awards. Credit: AMPAS.

Middle photo: "Chicago" DVD cover. Credit: Miramax Home Entertainment.

Bottom photo: "The Hobbit" book cover. Credit: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.


Gold Derby nuggets: 'Avatar' only 2-D on DVD for now | Peter Jackson on 'The Hobbit' | Drew Barrymore's fashion faux pas

April 16, 2010 |  3:04 pm

Avatar Blu Ray DVD • Our good pal Lou Lumenick chatted with "Avatar" producer Jon Landau at the recent DVD launch of the blockbuster. "'It's like going to a live concert when you have the CD at home,' he told me at a small press event in Hell's Kitchen where clips from the gorgeous Blu-ray version -- the scenes look a lot brighter and more detailed when you're not wearing 3-D glasses -- were shown." Landau revealed, "that between 5 to 10 minutes would be added for the theatrical reissue, which hasn't been officially announced by Fox but is expected in late summer, when there seems to be a gap in the IMAX release schedule." And Lou reports, "A full-featured edition will be released in the fall, with a 3-D Blu-ray likely follow sometime in 2011. 'People don't realize that the only reason Panasonic developed a 3-D TV is because we asked them to come in as a partner with us,' Landau said." NEW YORK POST

• Perennial Emmys also-ran Bill Maher has reupped with HBO for a ninth season of his talker "Real Time." The comedian has had little to laugh about when it comes to TV's top honors setting a record with no hardware to show for his 22 nominations. Next season the show will expand from 24 to 35 episodes with Maher appearing on the paycaster from February through November and taking a break in July.

Ellen Gamerman reports that this year's Tony Awards may be short one race as not enough of the new musicals boast original scores to warrant that category. Last's year winner was "Next to Normal," which was just honored with the Pulitzer prize for drama. "To compete for the award, more than 50% of a show's score must be original music. That was often not the case this season, which was dominated by musicals featuring popular rock songs and other tunes that already existed." As per Gamerman, "So far, 'Memphis' qualifies for best original score, and 'The Addams Family' is likely to make the cut, but other new musicals do not, including the critically acclaimed 'Fela!' and, probably, 'American Idiot,' opening next week." WALL STREET JOURNAL

The HobbitPatricia Chui chats with Peter Jackson about the status of "The Hobbit," the long-in-the-making two-part prequel to his hit trilogy "The Lord of the Rings." The three-time Oscar champ told her that "we've just delivered the script. Literally last week, we delivered the second of the two screenplays -- the first draft. So the studio's got both scripts now, which is a milestone; and if anything was holding it up, it was us doing the screenplays because we'd just been writing as fast as we can, but it took us this long to get them finished." And Sir Peter says that, "any character that's returning from 'The Lord of the Rings,' we obviously would love the same actors to play. But even those actors haven't been approached yet, or there [haven't] been any deals done. And the studio wouldn't organically do any of that until they've greenlit the film." MOVIEFONE

Roger Friedman reports that the producers of the rialto revival of "A Little Night Music" are considering replacing five-time Tony winner Angela Lansbury and Oscar champ Catherine Zeta-Jones -- who may be exiting the hit show as soon as June after the Tony Awards -- with mother-daughter act Blythe Danner and Gwyneth Paltrow. However, as Roger points out, "each is too young for the roles. Jones is three years older than Paltrow. Each of them is substantially younger than Glynis Johns was when she originated the role. Danner is strikingly younger than 85-year-old Lansbury, that’s for sure. Could it work? Well, they do call it acting. All those years, Estelle Getty played 20 years older as Sophia on 'Golden Girls.'" SHOWBIZ 411

Kenneth Jones breaks the news that the novel that was adapted into 1990 best picture Oscar champ "Dances with Wolves" is now being turned into a tuner. Theater producer Matt Murphy ("Memphis") has acquired the stage rights to Michael Blake's 1986 book" and "is putting together a writing team to adapt the novel into a musical for the Broadway stage. He expects the score to have music inspired by folk, Appalachian, Civil War and Native American music." PLAYBILL

Drew Barrymore 2006 Golden Globes • For many people, awards shows are all about the red carpet and rare is the star who will admit to having committed a fashion faux pas. However, Drew Barrymore candidly cops to having made her share of mistakes, revealing "my worst red-carpet moment is the Gucci green dress where my boobs look like watermelons, it's the worst. Never wear a high neck dress with a high belt. It makes your [breasts] look like they are at your waist. It was the Golden Globes. I felt so bad. I was like, 'I'm so sorry, Gucci. I have tarnished your name.'" While Barrymore may have been a fashion don't at those awards four years ago, this year she was the belle of the ball as she won a Golden Globe for best TV movie actress for her performance in "Grey Gardens." CONTACT MUSIC

Victoria Rowell may not have won a daytime Emmy during her many years on "The Young and the Restless" but that doesn't mean she is bitter about her three losses. Or is she? Check out this sassy spoof of her former co-stars. YOUTUBE

Top photo: "Avatar" DVD / Blu-Ray cover. Credit: Fox. Middle photo: "The Hobbit" cover. Credit: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Bottom photo: Drew Barrymore at the 2006 Golden Globes. Credit: NBC

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MTV Movie Awards nominations - Who got skunked

May 6, 2008 | 12:34 pm

As usual, the MTV Movie Awards' nominations slapped recent Oscar champs. The academy's winners of best picture ("No Country for Old Men"), best actor (Daniel Day-Lewis) and actress (Marion Cotillard) aren't nommed in corresponding categories, but — horrors! — Day-Lewis isn't even in the race for best villain! Hey, aren't MTV execs worried at all about him swinging that bowling pin in revenge?

Mtv_movie_awards_nominations

Other shocking snubs include these from MTV's best-pic race: "The Bourne Ultimatum," "Ratatouille" and "Knocked Up" (apparently, there's room only for one Judd Apatow flick and that's "Superbad," which has 3 noms).

We were waaaaay off predicting the best-kiss lineup. It's likely that the MTV kiddies didn't see "Atonement" (too uppity for gum-snappers) so they didn't know about Keira Knightley's lusty lip lock with James McAvoy. And maybe we were wrong to suggest that Adam Sandler and Kevin James might be listed for "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry." They don't really smooch, but do get close and punch each other with obvious affection right after they say "I do!"

Missing from the list of best breakthrough performance of the year was easily the biggest: "Juno" star Ellen Page. Also Emile Hirsch ("Into the Wild") and Amy Adams ("Enchanted"). What about Oscar nominee Saoirse Ronan ("Atonement")? Will they only notice her next year when she appears in Peter Jackson's "The Lovely Bones"?

And, hey, where was the whole category for best on-screen duo? Why was it dropped this year all of a sudden? When I asked a rep for MTV, she responded, "We change up the categories from time to time. :)"

See reax in our forums, CLICK HERE! See the full list of nominees and cast your vote at the MTV Movie Awards site - CLICK HERE


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